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Bicarbonate Linked To Sticky Mucus In Cystic Fibrosis

Date:
August 27, 2009
Source:
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Summary:
A hallmark of cystic fibrosis, a disease caused by mutations in the CTFR gene, is the accumulation of abnormally thick and sticky mucus in the lung, intestine, and various other organs. Although the accumulation of this mucus is thought likely to play a central role in the development of disease, how mutations in the CTFR gene lead to mucus accumulation have not been determined. Scientists have now provided insight into this issue by studying mouse small intestine segments ex vivo.

A hallmark of cystic fibrosis, a disease caused by mutations in the CTFR gene, is the accumulation of abnormally thick and sticky mucus in the lung, intestine, and various other organs. Although the accumulation of this mucus is thought likely to play a central role in the development of disease, how mutations in the CTFR gene lead to mucus accumulation have not been determined.

However, Paul Quinton and colleagues, at the University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, have now provided insight into this issue by studying mouse small intestine segments ex vivo, according to a paper to be published in the August 24 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. In an accompanying commentary, Robert DeLisle, at the University of Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, highlights the importance of the study and the potential new take on how mutations in the CTFR gene lead to mucus accumulation and disease.

One of the functions of the CTFR protein generated by the nonmutated CTFR gene is to transport bicarbonate (HCO3–) out of cells. In their study, Quinton and colleagues developed a new ex vivo system for monitoring mucus release from the mouse small intestine to investigate whether defects in this function of CFTR might affect mucus secretion. Although basal rates of mucus release were similar in the presence or absence of bicarbonate, mucus release stimulated by natural chemicals such as serotonin was markedly decreased in the absence of bicarbonate. Interestingly, in a mouse model of cystic fibrosis, mucus release stimulated by natural chemicals was minimal in the presence or absence of bicarbonate. The authors therefore suggest that normal mucus release requires concurrent bicarbonate secretion and that the abnormally thick and sticky mucus that characterizes cystic fibrosis might be caused by defective bicarbonate secretion.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of Clinical Investigation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Garcia et al. Normal mouse intestinal mucus release requires cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator-dependent bicarbonate secretion. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2009; DOI: 10.1172/JCI38662
  2. Robert C. De Lisle. Pass the bicarb: the importance of HCO3– for mucin release. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2009; DOI: 10.1172/JCI40598

Cite This Page:

Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Bicarbonate Linked To Sticky Mucus In Cystic Fibrosis." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 August 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090825085954.htm>.
Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2009, August 27). Bicarbonate Linked To Sticky Mucus In Cystic Fibrosis. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090825085954.htm
Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Bicarbonate Linked To Sticky Mucus In Cystic Fibrosis." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090825085954.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

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