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First discovery of the female sex hormone progesterone in a plant

Date:
February 7, 2010
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
In a finding that overturns conventional wisdom, scientists are reporting the first discovery of the female sex hormone progesterone in a plant. Until now, scientists thought that only animals could make progesterone. A steroid hormone secreted by the ovaries, progesterone prepares the uterus for pregnancy and maintains pregnancy.

Leaves of the walnut tree contain progesterone, the female sex hormone, discovered for the first time in a plant.
Credit: iStockphoto

In a finding that overturns conventional wisdom, scientists are reporting the first discovery of the female sex hormone progesterone in a plant. Until now, scientists thought that only animals could make progesterone. A steroid hormone secreted by the ovaries, progesterone prepares the uterus for pregnancy and maintains pregnancy. A synthetic version, progestin, is used in birth control pills and other medications.

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The discovery is reported in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Natural Products.

"The significance of the unequivocal identification of progesterone cannot be overstated," the article by Guido F. Pauli and colleagues, states. "While the biological role of progesterone has been extensively studied in mammals, the reason for its presence in plants is less apparent." They speculate that the hormone, like other steroid hormones, might be an ancient bioregulator that evolved billions of years ago, before the appearance of modern plants and animals. The new discovery may change scientific understanding of the evolution and function of progesterone in living things.

Scientists previously identified progesterone-like substances in plants and speculated that the hormone itself could exist in plants. But researchers had not found the actual hormone in plants until now. Pauli and colleagues used two powerful laboratory techniques, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy, to detect progesterone in leaves of the Common Walnut, or English Walnut, tree. They also identified five new progesterone-related steroids in a plant belonging to the buttercup family.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Pauli et al. Occurrence of Progesterone and Related Animal Steroids in Two Higher Plants. Journal of Natural Products, 2010; 100128124334075 DOI: 10.1021/np9007415

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "First discovery of the female sex hormone progesterone in a plant." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 February 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100204144815.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2010, February 7). First discovery of the female sex hormone progesterone in a plant. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100204144815.htm
American Chemical Society. "First discovery of the female sex hormone progesterone in a plant." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100204144815.htm (accessed February 26, 2015).

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