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Barents Sea: An effective ocean cooler

Date:
February 24, 2010
Source:
University of Bergen
Summary:
Stronger ocean currents have transported more heat to the Barents Sea over the last years. Despite this extra heat, the mean temperature has only increased modestly. The reason is a stronger heat loss caused by more open water during wintertime.

The Barents Sea has now less sea-ice-cover than before. Hence, it looses most of the extra heat from stronger ocean currents. Bear Island, between Norway and Svalbard.
Credit: Photo by Lars H. Smedsrud

The Barents Sea is a robust and effective ocean cooler. Despite its fairly shallow depth of 230 meters, it releases more energy to the atmosphere than any other sea around the Arctic.

A new study by four oceanographers in Bergen shows how the Barents Sea responds to variation of heat transport by the ocean. Results show that the northwards migration of the sea ice, and the larger open ocean areas in the south, can compensate for much of the increase in ocean heat transport since the mid 1990's.

The paper, published in Ocean Science, describes a new approach for understanding the Barents Sea. First, an overall heat budget had to be produced, including mean monthly ocean transport and atmospheric forcing. New estimates including the Norwegian Coastal Current makes the total transported heat to the Barents Sea about 70 TW. The researchers have divided the Barents Sea into a northern and southern area, and show that all of the heat is lost to the atmosphere in the south.

The heat is lost by the ocean in the southern Barents Sea through evaporation and sensible fluxes, as there is an approximate balance between the incoming solar, and the outgoing long wave, radiation. The northern Barents Sea receives little ocean heat transport, leading to early sea ice formation during winter.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Bergen. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. L. H. Smedsrud, R. Ingvaldsen, J. E. . Nilsen, and . Skagseth. Heat in the Barents Sea: Transport, storage, and surface fluxes. Ocean Science, 2010 (in press) [link]

Cite This Page:

University of Bergen. "Barents Sea: An effective ocean cooler." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 February 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100219102736.htm>.
University of Bergen. (2010, February 24). Barents Sea: An effective ocean cooler. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100219102736.htm
University of Bergen. "Barents Sea: An effective ocean cooler." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100219102736.htm (accessed September 22, 2014).

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