Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Chemical compound effective in destroying antibiotic-resistant biofilms

Date:
April 11, 2010
Source:
North Carolina State University
Summary:
Researchers have found a chemical compound that, when used in conjunction with conventional antibiotics, is effective in destroying biofilms produced by antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria such as the Staphylococcus strain MRSA and Acinetobacter. The compound also re-sensitizes those bacteria to antibiotics.

Researchers at North Carolina State University have found a chemical compound that, when used in conjunction with conventional antibiotics, is effective in destroying biofilms produced by antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria such as the Staphylococcus strain MRSA and Acinetobacter. The compound also re-sentsitizes those bacteria to antibiotics.

Infections from antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as MRSA are especially difficult to get rid of because the bacteria can attach to surfaces and then create biofilms, sticky layers of cells that act as a shield and prevent antibiotics from destroying the bacteria underneath. While a limited number of existing antibiotics may destroy part of the biofilm, enough bacteria survive to create a recurring infection as soon as antibiotic therapy stops, and over time the surviving bacteria build resistance to that antibiotic.

NC State chemist Dr. Christian Melander had already shown that combining a compound made from a class of molecules known as 2-aminoimidazoles with antibiotics was effective in dispersing the biofilms created by certain bacterial strains. The next step was to see if this combination could remove resistant bacteria from surfaces.

"The problem with biofilms is that even if you treat with effective antibiotics, they never succeed in completely dispersing the biofilm and killing the bacteria on the surface they've stuck to," Melander says. "This is especially exacerbated when the bacteria are antibiotic-resistant. Basically, if you are trying to treat a multi-drug resistant bacterial infection, you need to worry about both the bacteria forming a biofilm and disarming their antibiotic resistance genes."

Melander and his team, in collaboration with NC State biochemist John Cavanagh, found that pre-treating the bacteria with their compound and then introducing the antibiotic penicillin one hour later increased the penicillin's effectiveness 128-fold, even when the bacteria was penicillin resistant. The antibiotics also provided a 1,000-fold enhancement to the ability of the 2-aminoimidazole to disperse biofilms.

The researchers' results were published online March 8 in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

"We had two goals in mind -- to overcome antibiotic resistance and to disperse biofilms," Melander says. "This compound cooperates with conventional antibiotics, overcoming an infectious threat that would otherwise persist if treated with either agent individually."

The Department of Chemistry is part of NC State's College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, and the Department of Biochemistry is a part of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by North Carolina State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. S. A. Rogers, R. W. Huigens, J. Cavanagh, C. Melander. Synergistic Effects Between Conventional Antibiotics and 2-Aminoimidazole-Derived Antibiofilm Agents.. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 2010; DOI: 10.1128/AAC.01418-09

Cite This Page:

North Carolina State University. "Chemical compound effective in destroying antibiotic-resistant biofilms." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 April 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100408160907.htm>.
North Carolina State University. (2010, April 11). Chemical compound effective in destroying antibiotic-resistant biofilms. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100408160907.htm
North Carolina State University. "Chemical compound effective in destroying antibiotic-resistant biofilms." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100408160907.htm (accessed April 18, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Friday, April 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Vermont Goat Meat Gives Refugees Taste of Home

Vermont Goat Meat Gives Refugees Taste of Home

AP (Apr. 18, 2014) Dairy farmers and ethnic groups in Vermont are both benefiting from a unique collaborative effort that's feeding a growing need for fresh and affordable goat meat. (April 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
First Ever 'Female Penis' Discovered In Animal Kingdom

First Ever 'Female Penis' Discovered In Animal Kingdom

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) Not only are these newly discovered bugs' sex organs reversed, but they also mate for up to 70 hours. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) A new report shows rates of two foodborne infections increased in the U.S. in recent years, while salmonella actually dropped 9 percent. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Great British Farmland Boom

The Great British Farmland Boom

Reuters - Business Video Online (Apr. 17, 2014) Britain's troubled Co-operative Group is preparing to cash in on nearly 18,000 acres of farmland in one of the biggest UK land sales in decades. As Ivor Bennett reports, the market timing couldn't be better, with farmland prices soaring over 270 percent in the last 10 years. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins