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Understanding how a rare genetic mutation causes a severe brain disorder

Date:
April 26, 2010
Source:
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Summary:
Polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE) is a rare genetic disorder that was identified in an Old Order Mennonite pediatric population. It is characterized by abnormal brain development, an abnormally large brain, cognitive disability, and severe, therapy-resistant epilepsy. PMSE is caused by mutations in the gene STRADA. A team of researchers has now provided insight into how mutations in STRADA cause PMSE by analyzing a human PMSE brain and mice.
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FULL STORY

Polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE) is a rare genetic disorder that was identified in an Old Order Mennonite pediatric population. It is characterized by abnormal brain development, an abnormally large brain, cognitive disability, and severe, therapy-resistant epilepsy. PMSE is caused by mutations in the gene STRADA.

A team of researchers, led by Peter Crino, at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, has now provided insight into how mutations in STRADA cause PMSE by analyzing a human PMSE brain and mice.

Specifically, their data indicate that the lack of STRAD-alpha protein caused by the STRADA gene mutations results in the protein LKB1 being abnormally localized, and that this leads to activation of the mTOR signaling pathway, thereby promoting abnormal cell growth and brain development.

The authors suggest that early treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, which is used in the clinic to prevent rejection of organ transplants, and other mTOR inhibitors may prevent the devastating neurological features of PMSE.

In an accompanying commentary, Lucy Osborne, at the University of Toronto, Canada, discusses how the data generated by Crino and colleagues adds PMSE to a group of disorders caused by uncontrolled mTOR pathway activation and characterized by benign tumors and malformations of the brain.

The research appears in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of Clinical Investigation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Ksenia A. Orlova, Whitney E. Parker, Gregory G. Heuer, Victoria Tsai, Jason Yoon, Marianna Baybis, Robert S. Fenning, Kevin Strauss and Peter B. Crino. STRADα deficiency results in aberrant mTORC1 signaling during corticogenesis in humans and mice. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2010; DOI: 10.1172/JCI41592
  2. Lucy R. Osborne. Caveat mTOR: aberrant signaling disrupts corticogenesis. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2010; DOI: 10.1172/JCI43030

Cite This Page:

Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Understanding how a rare genetic mutation causes a severe brain disorder." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 April 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100426212758.htm>.
Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2010, April 26). Understanding how a rare genetic mutation causes a severe brain disorder. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100426212758.htm
Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Understanding how a rare genetic mutation causes a severe brain disorder." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100426212758.htm (accessed April 27, 2015).

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