Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

'Stress' protein could halt aging process, say scientists

Date:
May 24, 2010
Source:
University of Liverpool
Summary:
Scientists have discovered that a protein which responds to stress can halt the degeneration of muscle mass caused during the body's aging process.

Scientists in the UK and the U.S. have discovered that a protein which responds to stress can halt the degeneration of muscle mass caused during the body's aging process.

HSP10 (Heat Shock Protein), helps monitor and organise protein interactions in the body, and responds to environmental stresses, such as exercise and infection, by increasing its production inside cells. Researchers at Liverpool, in collaboration with colleagues at the University of California, found that excessive amounts of HSP10 inside mitochondria -- 'organs' that act as energy generators in cells -- can halt the body's aging process by preserving muscle strength.

HSP10 occurs naturally in all living organisms and scientists believe that study into its functions could prove significant for the design of future health care for the elderly, who are particularly susceptible to muscle damage. Researchers examined the role HSP10 plays inside cells, to further understand how aging muscle tissue can recover from stress.

Professor Anne McArdle, from the University's School of Clinical Sciences, said: "We studied the role of HSP10 inside mitochondria, as it is here that unstable chemicals are produced which can harm parts of the cell. The damage caused by this is thought to play an important part in the aging process, in which skeletal muscle becomes smaller and weaker and more susceptible to stress damage.

"In response to these stresses HSP10 increases its levels and helps cells resist damage and recover more effectively. Our research is the first to demonstrate that age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass is not inevitable and this could have considerable implications for the future health care of the elderly. Between the ages of 50 and 70 we lose approximately 25-30% of our muscle. Falls -- a major cause of injury and death in people over the age of 65 -- are often the direct result of loss of mobility and weakened skeletal muscle.

"We now need to look at how we might artificially increase production of HSP10 in the body, specifically in relation to aging muscle, to see if the protein could be used as a therapeutic measure. In time, clinical trials must take place to establish what benefits HSP10 can have on human quality of life, such as preservation of muscle strength."

The research, funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), is published in the American Journal of Physiology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Liverpool. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. A. C. Kayani, G. L. Close, W. H. Dillmann, R. Mestril, M. J. Jackson, A. McArdle. Overexpression of HSP10 in skeletal muscle of transgenic mice prevents the age-related fall in maximum tetanic force generation and muscle cross-sectional area.. AJP: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 2010; DOI: 10.1152/ajpregu.00334.2009

Cite This Page:

University of Liverpool. "'Stress' protein could halt aging process, say scientists." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 May 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100524101341.htm>.
University of Liverpool. (2010, May 24). 'Stress' protein could halt aging process, say scientists. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100524101341.htm
University of Liverpool. "'Stress' protein could halt aging process, say scientists." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100524101341.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Newsy (July 24, 2014) Sheik Umar Khan has treated many of the people infected in the Ebola outbreak, and now he's become one of them. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Condemned Man's US Execution Takes Nearly Two Hours

Condemned Man's US Execution Takes Nearly Two Hours

AFP (July 24, 2014) America's death penalty debate raged Thursday after it took nearly two hours for Arizona to execute a prisoner who lost a Supreme Court battle challenging the experimental lethal drug cocktail. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
China's Ageing Millions Look Forward to Bleak Future

China's Ageing Millions Look Forward to Bleak Future

AFP (July 24, 2014) China's elderly population is expanding so quickly that children struggle to look after them, pushing them to do something unexpected in Chinese society- move their parents into a nursing home. Duration: 02:07 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins