Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Epigenetic similarities between Wilms tumor cells and normal kidney stem cells found

Date:
June 4, 2010
Source:
Massachusetts General Hospital
Summary:
A detailed analysis of the epigenetics -- factors controlling when and in what tissues genes are expressed -- of Wilms tumor reveals striking similarities to stem cells normally found in fetal kidneys. New cellular pathways that are critical for Wilms tumor development and may also apply to other pediatric cancers have been identified.

A detailed analysis of the epigenetics -- factors controlling when and in what tissues genes are expressed -- of Wilms tumor reveals striking similarities to stem cells normally found in fetal kidneys. These findings by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center researchers have revealed new cellular pathways that are critical for Wilms tumor development and may also apply to other pediatric cancers.

Related Articles


The report appears in the June 4 Cell Stem Cell.

Genetic mutations -- changes to the sequence of DNA molecules -- are known to underlie many types of cancer. But the role of epigenetics in tumor development is just beginning to be explored. The MGH team has been using advanced sequencing technology to investigate the role of chromatin, the structure that makes up chromosomes and consists of DNA wrapped around a protein backbone studded with molecules that can activate or suppress gene expression.

"An organism has only one genome, but it has many epigenomes because different cell types organize their genome into chromatin in ways that allow them to express just the right set of genes," explains Bradley Bernstein, MD, PhD, of MGH Pathology and the MGH Cancer Center, senior author of the study. Earlier studies from Bernstein's team used cutting-edge sequencing technologies to identify chromatin structures characteristic of embryonic stem cells. They observed active versions of chromatin structures termed "domains" at genes with critical developmental functions and saw features of both active and repressed chromatin at "bivalent" genes that were not currently expressed but maintained the potential for activation.

For the current study, Bernstein teamed with Miguel Rivera, MD, and Daniel Haber, MD, PhD, of the MGH Cancer Center, along with Aviva Presser Aiden, PhD, of the Broad Institute, to apply those powerful genomic technologies to cancer. The researchers chose to examine the epigenetics of Wilms tumor, a kidney cancer that usually occurs in children, because pediatric cancer cells are likely to have few genetic alterations, making it easier to identify epigenetic changes.

Whole-genome chromatin screening of Wilms tumors, normal kidney tissues and fetal kidney tissues revealed that the chromatin of Wilms tumors contains the same types of active and bivalent chromatin structures identified in embryonic stem cells. Among the active genes were many well established regulators of kidney development, as well as a new set of genes that may be critical in tumor development. The presence of bivalent genes shows that normal developmental programs had been interrupted at an early stage in the tumor cells. In essence, Wilms cells give rise to a tumor by indefinitely continuing to behave like renal stem cells.

While surgical removal and chemotherapy are successful for the majority of patients with Wilms tumor, current treatment protocols fail in up to 15 percent of patients, notes Rivera, who is co-lead author of the Cell Stem Cell report. "Epigenetic analysis has provided an unprecedented level of detail on the biology of Wilms tumor, allowing us to identify new genes that are likely to be important in this disease and to pinpoint specific defects in developmental pathways. Both of these findings may provide new avenues for therapy," he says. Rivera is an assistant professor of Pathology, and Bernstein an associate professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School.

Aviva Presser Aiden, PhD, of the Broad Institute is co-lead author of the report. Additional co-authors are Haber, Esther Rheinbay, Manching Ku, Erik Coffman and Than Truong, MGH Cancer Center; Sara Vargas, MD, Childrens Hospital Boston; and Eric Lander, DPhil, Broad Institute. Support for the study includes grants from the National Human Genome Research Institute, the National Cancer Institute, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Massachusetts General Hospital. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Aviva Presser Aiden, Miguel N. Rivera, Esther Rheinbay, Manching Ku, Erik J. Coffman, Thanh T. Truong, Sara O. Vargas, Eric S. Lander, Daniel A. Haber, Bradley E. Bernstein. Wilms Tumor Chromatin Profiles Highlight Stem Cell Properties and a Renal Developmental Network. Cell Stem Cell, Volume 6, Issue 6, 591-602, 4 June 2010 DOI: 10.1016/j.stem.2010.03.016

Cite This Page:

Massachusetts General Hospital. "Epigenetic similarities between Wilms tumor cells and normal kidney stem cells found." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 June 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100603123720.htm>.
Massachusetts General Hospital. (2010, June 4). Epigenetic similarities between Wilms tumor cells and normal kidney stem cells found. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100603123720.htm
Massachusetts General Hospital. "Epigenetic similarities between Wilms tumor cells and normal kidney stem cells found." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100603123720.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Kids Die While Under Protective Services

Kids Die While Under Protective Services

AP (Dec. 18, 2014) As part of a six-month investigation of child maltreatment deaths, the AP found that hundreds of deaths from horrific abuse and neglect could have been prevented. AP's Haven Daley reports. (Dec. 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

AFP (Dec. 17, 2014) Border closures, quarantines and crop losses in West African nations battling the Ebola virus could lead to as many as one million people going hungry, UN food agencies said on Wednesday. Duration: 00:52 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) Can fat disappear into thin air? New research finds that during weight loss, over 80 percent of a person's fat molecules escape through the lungs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Your Boss Should Let You Sleep In

Why Your Boss Should Let You Sleep In

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) According to research out of the University of Pennsylvania, waking up for work is the biggest factor that causes Americans to lose sleep. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins