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Nobel Prize in Physics 2010 for graphene -- 'two-dimensional' material

Date:
October 5, 2010
Source:
Nobel Foundation
Summary:
A thin flake of ordinary carbon, just one atom thick, lies behind this year's Nobel Prize in Physics. Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov have shown that carbon in such a flat form has exceptional properties that originate from the remarkable world of quantum physics.

Graphene from graphite: Graphite is a basic material found in nature. When taken apart graphite sheets become graphene. A rolled up layer of graphene forms a carbon nanotube, folded up it becomes a small football, fullerene. Hidden inside graphite, graphene was waiting to be discovered.
Credit: Airi Iliste/The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for 2010 to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, both of the University of Manchester, "for groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene."

A thin flake of ordinary carbon, just one atom thick, lies behind this year's Nobel Prize in Physics. Geim and Novoselov have shown that carbon in such a flat form has exceptional properties that originate from the remarkable world of quantum physics.

Graphene is a form of carbon. As a material it is completely new -- not only the thinnest ever but also the strongest. As a conductor of electricity it performs as well as copper. As a conductor of heat it outperforms all other known materials. It is almost completely transparent, yet so dense that not even helium, the smallest gas atom, can pass through it. Carbon, the basis of all known life on earth, has surprised us once again.

Geim and Novoselov extracted the graphene from a piece of graphite such as is found in ordinary pencils. Using regular adhesive tape they managed to obtain a flake of carbon with a thickness of just one atom. This at a time when many believed it was impossible for such thin crystalline materials to be stable.

However, with graphene, physicists can now study a new class of two-dimensional materials with unique properties. Graphene makes experiments possible that give new twists to the phenomena in quantum physics. Also a vast variety of practical applications now appear possible including the creation of new materials and the manufacture of innovative electronics. Graphene transistors are predicted to be substantially faster than today's silicon transistors and result in more efficient computers.

Since it is practically transparent and a good conductor, graphene is suitable for producing transparent touch screens, light panels, and maybe even solar cells.

When mixed into plastics, graphene can turn them into conductors of electricity while making them more heat resistant and mechanically robust. This resilience can be utilised in new super strong materials, which are also thin, elastic and lightweight. In the future, satellites, airplanes, and cars could be manufactured out of the new composite materials.

This year's Laureates have been working together for a long time now. Konstantin Novoselov, 36, first worked with Andre Geim, 51, as a PhD-student in the Netherlands. He subsequently followed Geim to the United Kingdom. Both of them originally studied and began their careers as physicists in Russia. Now they are both professors at the University of Manchester.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Nobel Foundation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Nobel Foundation. "Nobel Prize in Physics 2010 for graphene -- 'two-dimensional' material." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 October 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101005085507.htm>.
Nobel Foundation. (2010, October 5). Nobel Prize in Physics 2010 for graphene -- 'two-dimensional' material. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101005085507.htm
Nobel Foundation. "Nobel Prize in Physics 2010 for graphene -- 'two-dimensional' material." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101005085507.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

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