Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists look deeper for coal ash hazards

Date:
November 29, 2010
Source:
Duke University
Summary:
As the US Environmental Protection Agency weighs whether to define coal ash as hazardous waste, a new study identifies new monitoring protocols and insights that can help investigators more accurately measure and predict the ecological impacts of coal ash contaminants.

Duke scientists have been sampling the Kingston spill since it happened.
Credit: Avner Vengosh

As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency weighs whether to define coal ash as hazardous waste, a Duke University study identifies new monitoring protocols and insights that can help investigators more accurately measure and predict the ecological impacts of coal ash contaminants.

Related Articles


"The take-away lesson is we need to change how and where we look for coal ash contaminants," says Avner Vengosh, professor of geochemistry and water quality at Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment. "Risks to water quality and aquatic life don't end with surface water contamination, but much of our current monitoring does."

The study, published online this week in the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Science and Technology, documents contaminant levels in aquatic ecosystems over an 18-month period following a massive coal sludge spill in 2008 at a Tennessee Valley Authority power plant in Kingston, Tenn.

By analyzing more than 220 water samples collected over the 18-month period, the Duke team found that high concentrations of arsenic from the TVA coal ash remained in pore water -- water trapped within river-bottom sediment -- long after contaminant levels in surface waters dropped back below safe thresholds. Samples extracted from 10 centimeters to half a meter below the surface of sediment in downstream rivers contained arsenic levels of up to 2,000 parts per billion - well above the EPA's thresholds of 10 parts per billion for safe drinking water, and 150 parts per billion for protection of aquatic life.

"It's like cleaning your house," Vengosh says of the finding. "Everything may look clean, but if you look under the rugs, that's where you find the dirt."

The potential impacts of pore water contamination extend far beyond the river bottom, he explains, because "this is where the biological food chain begins, so any bioaccumulation of toxins will start here."

The research team, which included two graduate students from Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment and Pratt School of Engineering, also found that acidity and the loss or gain of oxygen in water play key roles in controlling how arsenic, selenium and other coal ash contaminants leach into the environment. Knowing this will help scientists better predict the fate and migration of contaminants derived from coal ash residues, particularly those stored in holding ponds and landfills, as well as any potential leakage into lakes, rivers and other aquatic systems.

The study comes as the EPA is considering whether to define ash from coal-burning power plants as hazardous waste. The deadline for public comment to the EPA was Nov. 19; a final ruling -- what Vengosh calls "a defining moment" -- is expected in coming months.

"At more than 3.7 million cubic meters, the scope of the TVA spill is unprecedented, but similar processes are taking place in holding ponds, landfills and other coal ash storage facilities across the nation," he says. "As long as coal ash isn't regulated as hazardous waste, there is no way to prevent discharges of contaminants from these facilities and protect the environment."

Laura Ruhl, a Ph.D. student in Vengosh's lab, is lead author of the study, which was funded by the National Science Foundation. Vengosh is corresponding author. Coauthors are Gary S. Dwyer, senior research scientist; Heileen Hsu-Kim, assistant professor of environmental engineering; and Amrika Deonarine, a Ph.D. student in Hsu-Kim's lab.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Duke University. The original article was written by Tim Lucas. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Laura Ruhl, Avner Vengosh, Gary S. Dwyer, Heileen Hsu-Kim, Amrika Deonarine. Environmental Impacts of the Coal Ash Spill in Kingston, Tennessee: An 18-Month Survey. Environmental Science & Technology, 2010; 101124150941072 DOI: 10.1021/es1026739

Cite This Page:

Duke University. "Scientists look deeper for coal ash hazards." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 November 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101129203342.htm>.
Duke University. (2010, November 29). Scientists look deeper for coal ash hazards. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101129203342.htm
Duke University. "Scientists look deeper for coal ash hazards." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101129203342.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Earth & Climate News

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Navy Unveils Robot Fish

Navy Unveils Robot Fish

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Dec. 18, 2014) The U.S. Navy unveils an underwater device that mimics the movement of a fish. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Arctic Warming Twice As Fast As Rest Of Planet

Arctic Warming Twice As Fast As Rest Of Planet

Newsy (Dec. 18, 2014) The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet, thanks in part to something called feedback. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ivory Trade Boom Swamps Law Efforts

Ivory Trade Boom Swamps Law Efforts

Reuters - Business Video Online (Dec. 17, 2014) Demand for ivory has claimed the lives of tens of thousands of African elephants and now a conservation report says the illegal trade is overwhelming efforts to enforce the law. Amy Pollock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Indictments in West Virginia Chemical Spill Case

Indictments in West Virginia Chemical Spill Case

AP (Dec. 17, 2014) A grand jury indicted four former executives of Freedom Industries, the company at the center of the Jan. 9, 2014 chemical spill in Charleston, West Virginia. The spill contaminated the Elk River and the water supply of 300,000 people. (Dec. 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins