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Growing hypoxic zones reduce habitat for billfish and tuna

Date:
December 23, 2010
Source:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Summary:
Billfish and tuna, important commercial and recreational fish species, may be more vulnerable to fishing pressure because of shrinking habitat, according to a new study. An expanding zone of low oxygen, known as a hypoxic zone, in the Atlantic Ocean is encroaching upon these species' preferred oxygen-abundant habitat, forcing them into shallower waters where they are more likely to be caught.

Samples of surface skin slime are taken from the Atlantic sailfish to determine gender.
Credit: NOAA

Billfish and tuna, important commercial and recreational fish species, may be more vulnerable to fishing pressure because of shrinking habitat, according to a new study published by scientists from NOAA, The Billfish Foundation, and University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science.

An expanding zone of low oxygen, known as a hypoxic zone, in the Atlantic Ocean is encroaching upon these species' preferred oxygen-abundant habitat, forcing them into shallower waters where they are more likely to be caught.

During the study, published recently in the journal Fisheries Oceanography, scientists tagged 79 sailfish and blue marlin with satellite tracking devices in the western North Atlantic, off south Florida and the Caribbean; and eastern tropical Atlantic, off the coast of West Africa. The pop off archival satellite tags monitored horizontal and vertical movement patterns. Researchers confirmed that billfish prefer oxygen rich waters closer to the surface and will actively avoid waters low in oxygen.

While these hypoxic zones occur naturally in many areas of the world's tropical and equatorial oceans, scientists are concerned because these zones are expanding and occurring closer to the sea surface, and are expected to continue to grow as sea temperatures rise.

"The hypoxic zone off West Africa, which covers virtually all the equatorial waters in the Atlantic Ocean, is roughly the size of the continental United States, and it's growing," said Dr. Eric D. Prince, NOAA's Fisheries Service research fishery biologist. "With the current cycle of climate change and accelerated global warming, we expect the size of this zone to increase, further reducing the available habitat for these fish."

Less available habitat can lead to more fish being caught since the fish are concentrated near the surface. Higher catch rates from these areas may give the false appearance of more abundant fish stocks. The shrinking availability of habitat and resulting increases to catch rates are important factors for scientists to consider when doing population assessments.

Researchers forecast that climate change and its associated rise in ocean temperatures will further increase the expansion of hypoxic zones in the world's oceans. As water temperature increases, the amount of oxygen dissolved in water decreases, further squeezing billfish into dwindling available habitat and exposing them to even higher levels of exploitation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Eric D. Prince, Jiangang Luo, C. Phillip Goodyear, John P. Hoolihan, Derke Snodgrass, Eric S. Orbesen, Joseph E. Serafy, Mauricio Ortiz and Michael J. Schirripa. Ocean scale hypoxia-based habitat compression of Atlantic istiophorid billfishes. Fisheries Oceanography, Volume 19, Issue 6 DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2419.2010.00556

Cite This Page:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. "Growing hypoxic zones reduce habitat for billfish and tuna." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 December 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101222162402.htm>.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (2010, December 23). Growing hypoxic zones reduce habitat for billfish and tuna. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101222162402.htm
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. "Growing hypoxic zones reduce habitat for billfish and tuna." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101222162402.htm (accessed July 30, 2014).

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