Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

The quest for the ultimate blue cheese

Date:
February 4, 2011
Source:
University of Nottingham
Summary:
It’s the champagne of the cheese world and the gastronomic pride of the East Midlands but now blue cheeses like Stilton are literally under the microscope in a quest for the best possible quality.

The secrets of blue cheese.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Nottingham

It's the champagne of the cheese world and the gastronomic pride of the East Midlands but now blue cheeses like Stilton are literally under the microscope in a quest for the best possible quality.

Researchers at The University of Nottingham and The University of Northampton are working with a Nottinghamshire cheesemaker to examine what gives blue cheeses their distinctive taste, texture and smell.

The scientists hope to find out exactly how the microorganisms in blue cheese work which could lead to better quality, consistency and fewer defects in the manufacturing process. They are working with Stichelton Dairy on the Welbeck Estate in North Nottinghamshire which produces a classic English unpasteurised blue cheese, similar to Stilton.

Microorganisms, known in the trade as starter cultures, are added to milk in the manufacture of cheeses. But the final 'flora' of a cheese develops during ripening and contains many microorganisms not originally added in the production, known as 'secondary flora'.

Previous work at The University of Nottingham has shown that in complex cheeses like Stilton the secondary flora is different in different parts of the cheese (core, blue veins and rind) and that these organisms contribute to the flavour properties of the product.

Also, some of these organisms may actually enhance the cheese's 'blue' aroma characteristics whilst others may be undesirable as they have antifungal properties which can stop the mould growing and prevent the characteristic blue veins developing.

The research will look more closely at how secondary flora contributes to flavour development and which microflora may need controlling to allow blue veins to develop. The identification of any natural antifungal compounds may have a wide range of applications both within the food industry and outside.

The research project is one of five Collaborative Research and Development grants worth a total of more than 245,000 announced by the Food and Drink iNet, which co-ordinates innovation support for businesses, universities and individuals working in the food and drink sector in the East Midlands.

Funded by East Midlands Development Agency (emda) and the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), the Food and Drink iNet is one of four regional iNets that has developed an effective network to link academic and private sector expertise and knowledge with local food and drink business innovation needs.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Nottingham. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Nottingham. "The quest for the ultimate blue cheese." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 February 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110204092151.htm>.
University of Nottingham. (2011, February 4). The quest for the ultimate blue cheese. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110204092151.htm
University of Nottingham. "The quest for the ultimate blue cheese." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110204092151.htm (accessed August 29, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Friday, August 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Killer Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water System

Killer Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water System

AP (Aug. 28, 2014) State health officials say testing has confirmed the presence of a killer amoeba in a water system serving three St. John the Baptist Parish towns. (Aug. 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Australian Sheep Gets Long Overdue Haircut

Raw: Australian Sheep Gets Long Overdue Haircut

AP (Aug. 28, 2014) Hoping to break the record for world's wooliest, Shaun the sheep came up 10 pounds shy with his fleece weighing over 50 pounds after being shorn for the first time in years. (Aug. 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Minds Blown: Scientists Develop Fish That Walk On Land

Minds Blown: Scientists Develop Fish That Walk On Land

Newsy (Aug. 28, 2014) Canadian scientists looking into the very first land animals took a fish out of water and forced it to walk. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Huge Ancient Wine Cellar Found In Israel

Huge Ancient Wine Cellar Found In Israel

Newsy (Aug. 28, 2014) An international team uncovered a large ancient wine celler that likely belonged to a Cannonite ruler. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins