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Techniques to manipulate plant adaption in arid climates developed

Date:
February 15, 2011
Source:
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Summary:
By manipulating a specific gene, plant researchers have discovered they can impact lateral root growth. Lateral root development is a highly regulated process that determines a plant's growth and ability to adapt to life in different environmental conditions.

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev researchers have developed techniques to manipulate root development functionality that can help plants better adapt to hostile growing environments.

In a recent paper published in the journal The Plant Cell, BGU researchers were able show that by manipulating a specific gene they could impact lateral root growth. Lateral root (LR) development is a highly regulated process that determines a plant's growth and ability to adapt to life in different environmental conditions.

The researchers identified ABI4, a master-gene that controls LR development, then mutated the gene and constructed transgenic plants in which this gene is over-expressed. They demonstrated that the ABI4 gene functions at a central junction that determines the accumulation of signals from three different plant hormones. The balance and manipulation of these signals, achieved via ABI4, regulates root structure development.

According to the research conducted by BGU student Doron Shkolnik-Inbar and Prof. Dudy Bar-Zvi in BGU's Department of Life Sciences, "the revolutionary research will allow control and manipulation of the level of root branching, enabling plants to adapt to arid soils or high salinity."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. D. Shkolnik-Inbar, D. Bar-Zvi. ABI4 Mediates Abscisic Acid and Cytokinin Inhibition of Lateral Root Formation by Reducing Polar Auxin Transport in Arabidopsis. The Plant Cell, 2010; 22 (11): 3560 DOI: 10.1105/tpc.110.074641

Cite This Page:

American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. "Techniques to manipulate plant adaption in arid climates developed." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 February 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110215102937.htm>.
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. (2011, February 15). Techniques to manipulate plant adaption in arid climates developed. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110215102937.htm
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. "Techniques to manipulate plant adaption in arid climates developed." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110215102937.htm (accessed August 20, 2014).

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