Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

How much can a cell uptake?

Date:
March 3, 2011
Source:
University of Haifa
Summary:
Immunological research has revealed a critical component in the "decision-making" process of white blood cells that play a role in the healing process from bacterial inflammation.

Macrophage (blue staining) engulfing dead neutrophils (white spots) taken using confocal light (left) and fluorescent (right) microscopy.
Credit: Courtesy of the University of Haifa

Immunological research at the University of Haifa, Israel, has made a new breakthrough, revealing a critical component in the "decision-making" process of white blood cells that play a role in the healing process from bacterial inflammation. "The process that we have discovered can assist in the development of drugs that are based on the natural processes that take place in the human body, unlike most of the existing drugs that attempt to curb inflammation by artificial means," explains Dr. Amiram Ariel of the Department of Biology at the University of Haifa, who headed the study.

Related Articles


The research and its results have been published in the scientific journal European Journal of Immunology.

Bacterial inflammation forms in the body when bacteria (pathogens) penetrate body tissue. In response, specific types of white blood cells (neutrophils) begin to fight the invaders, to destroy and remove them from the tissue. In normal conditions, inflammation is terminated once the cells have managed to eradicate the bacteria and then undergo programmed cell death. At that point, another type of white blood cells come on stage -- macrophages -- whose job it is to take up the dead cells (the neutrophils) and to restore the tissue to its normal functioning state. While the macrophages feast on their cell meal, they gain the ability to begin the tissue's rehabilitation process. However, at one point they abandon the tissue and make their way over to immune system organs, via the lymphatic system, where they deliver the "back to routine" message to the rest of the immune system. This message is important for the body's return to normal functioning. Until now, however, the when and how that directs macrophages' leaving the inflamed tissue remained unknown.

Dr. Ariel explains that even when the body manages to cope with the bacterial invaders, there is also the danger of "excessive" healing that will result in fibrosis and scar formation. This happens when the system reels out of control and "over-heals" the previously infected area. Fibrosis can lead to malfunctioning of the healing tissue, tissue death and sometimes even mortality. To understand why this happens, it is important to identify and understand the way macrophages' govern the healing process.

The current study, conducted by Dr. Ariel alongside a team of students led by Dr. Sagie Schif-Zuck, set out to probe the critical stage of the healing process, when the macrophages decide to relocate and adjust their healing activities, moving from local rehabilitation of the damaged tissue to shut down of systemic immune responses at organs of the immune system.

The researchers discovered that the macrophages have a fascinating "uptake threshold" of seven cells. After engulfing seven neutrophils they are "licensed" to leave the tissue and continue with their remote tasks. The research also found that these cells are sensitive to the tissue's healing pace, so that when the tissue is healing quicker, they are permitted to leave earlier, and when the tissue is finding it harder to repair itself, they hang around longer, even after reaching the uptake threshold of seven cells. The researchers also discovered substances that "inform" the cells on the tissue's rate of repair, and found that by injecting these substances, the macrophages' transition to immune organs is accelerated while new macrophages are recruited to further treat the damaged tissue and continue the healing process. In addition, the study revealed that as they leave the tissue, the macrophages undergo molecular changes necessary to carry out their new functions in the lymphatic system.

"Our new study has found a major event in the inflammatory healing process that is responsible for the transition of macrophages from local rehabilitation of the damaged tissue to its consequent role in promoting the immune system's return to routine. The findings from our study can assist in the development of biological drugs that are based on the body's natural processes and biomolecules. Today, most drugs are designed to block particular pathways in the inflammatory process, which is also a "fight back" strategy found in bacteria and viruses; but in many cases, the body relates to such a drug as a type of 'bacterial invasion', finds ways to circumvent it and produces an alternative immunological response to the blocked one. By harnessing the natural healing process that we have discovered, the body will be able to naturally complete and terminate all the inflammatory processes, and will be able to avoid the deficiencies of existing anti-inflammatory treatments," Dr. Ariel concludes.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Haifa. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Sagie Schif-Zuck, Nufar Gross, Simaan Assi, Ran Rostoker, Charles N. Serhan, Amiram Ariel. Saturated-efferocytosis generates pro-resolving CD11blow macrophages: Modulation by resolvins and glucocorticoids. European Journal of Immunology, 2011; 41 (2): 366 DOI: 10.1002/eji.201040801

Cite This Page:

University of Haifa. "How much can a cell uptake?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110302101656.htm>.
University of Haifa. (2011, March 3). How much can a cell uptake?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110302101656.htm
University of Haifa. "How much can a cell uptake?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110302101656.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Fauci Says Ebola Risk in US "essentially Zero"

Fauci Says Ebola Risk in US "essentially Zero"

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) NIAID Director Anthony Fauci said the risk of Ebola becoming an epidemic in the U.S. is essentially zero Thursday at the Washington Ideas Forum. He also said an Ebola vaccine will be tested in West Africa in the next few months. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nurse Defies Ebola Quarantine With Bike Ride

Nurse Defies Ebola Quarantine With Bike Ride

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) A nurse who vowed to defy Maine's voluntary quarantine for health care workers who treated Ebola patients followed through on her promise Thursday, leaving her home for an hour-long bike ride. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pot-Infused Edibles Raise Concerns in Colorado

Pot-Infused Edibles Raise Concerns in Colorado

AFP (Oct. 30, 2014) Colorado may have legalized marijuana for recreational use, but the debate around the decision still continues, with a recent - failed - attempt to ban cannabis-infused edibles. Duration: 01:53 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
British Navy Ship Arrives in Sierra Leone With Ebola Aid

British Navy Ship Arrives in Sierra Leone With Ebola Aid

AFP (Oct. 30, 2014) The British ship RFA ARGUS arrived in Sierra Leone to deliver supplies and equipment to help the fight against Ebola. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins