Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

On-site cardiology team dramatically improves care for heart attack patients

Date:
April 7, 2011
Source:
Loyola University Health System
Summary:
The availability of an in-house, around-the-clock interventional cardiology team dramatically decreases the time it takes to restore blood flow to heart attack patients, according to new data.

The availability of an in-house, around-the-clock interventional cardiology team dramatically decreases the time it takes to restore blood flow to heart attack patients, according to data presented this week. These findings were reported by researchers from Loyola University Health System (LUHS) at the American College of Cardiology annual meeting in New Orleans.

Related Articles


In April 2009, Loyola became the first hospital in Illinois to launch a Heart Attack Rapid Response Team (HARRT). This group includes an interventional cardiologist, a nurse and other members of the cardiac catheterization team who are available at the hospital 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Most hospitals do not have such teams on site during nights and weekends.

"Valuable time is lost when nurses, doctors and technicians have to be called in from home," said interventional cardiologist John Lopez, MD, study investigator and HARRT co-director, LUHS. "Our staff is on hand and prepared all of the time to meet patients when they arrive and require immediate care."

A task force of the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association recommends that patients undergoing heart attacks receive balloon angioplasties as soon as possible or within 90 minutes of arriving at the hospital -- known as the "door-to-balloon" time.

These data revealed Loyola has far exceeded this standard since the HARRT program launched, with a median door-to-balloon time of just 47 minutes. All patients received angioplasties within 90 minutes and 82 percent received them within 60 minutes. These results greatly exceed the national standards and results from the best hospitals in the country.

During a heart attack, a blockage in an artery stops blood flow. Heart muscle begins to die due to lack of blood and oxygen. But a balloon angioplasty, if done in time, can stop a heart attack by restoring blood flow.

"Having a team on site 24/7 is the best way to enhance emergency angioplasty times," said Michelle Fennessy, APN, study investigator, LUHS. "By treating patients quickly, you save more lives and improve their prognosis."

Other study investigators from Loyola included Wojciech Nowak DO, PhD, Fred Leya, MD, Robert S. Dieter, MD, Bruce Lewis, MD, Lowell Steen, MD, Mark E. Cichon, DO, Beatrice Probst, MD, Michael Ryan, MD, Jayson Liu, MD, Catherine Smith, RN, MBA, Michael Jarotkiewicz, MBA, David Wilber, MD, and Brian Nguyen, MD.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Loyola University Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Loyola University Health System. "On-site cardiology team dramatically improves care for heart attack patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 April 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110407171730.htm>.
Loyola University Health System. (2011, April 7). On-site cardiology team dramatically improves care for heart attack patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110407171730.htm
Loyola University Health System. "On-site cardiology team dramatically improves care for heart attack patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110407171730.htm (accessed December 19, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, December 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Kids Die While Under Protective Services

Kids Die While Under Protective Services

AP (Dec. 18, 2014) As part of a six-month investigation of child maltreatment deaths, the AP found that hundreds of deaths from horrific abuse and neglect could have been prevented. AP's Haven Daley reports. (Dec. 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dads-To-Be Also Experience Hormone Changes During Pregnancy

Dads-To-Be Also Experience Hormone Changes During Pregnancy

Newsy (Dec. 18, 2014) A study from University of Michigan researchers found that expectant fathers see a decrease in testosterone as the baby's birth draws near. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Prenatal Exposure To Pollution Might Increase Autism Risk

Prenatal Exposure To Pollution Might Increase Autism Risk

Newsy (Dec. 18, 2014) Harvard researchers found children whose mothers were exposed to high pollution levels in the third trimester were twice as likely to develop autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

AFP (Dec. 17, 2014) Border closures, quarantines and crop losses in West African nations battling the Ebola virus could lead to as many as one million people going hungry, UN food agencies said on Wednesday. Duration: 00:52 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins