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Hunting for deadly bacteria

Date:
May 5, 2011
Source:
McMaster University
Summary:
Biochemists have developed a simple test that can swiftly and accurately identify specific pathogens using a system that will "hunt" for bacteria, identifying their harmful presence before they have a chance to contaminate our food and water.

Professor Yingfu Li (far right) with two of his research team members, Sergio Aguirre (left) and Monsur Ali (centre), whose recently published paper in the Angewandte Chemie journal discusses research that will help detect deadly food-borne bacteria.
Credit: Image courtesy of McMaster University

You can't see them, or smell them or taste them. They can be in our water and in our food, multiplying so rapidly that conventional testing methods for detecting pathogens such as E.coli, Salmonella and Listeria come too late for the tens of thousands of Canadians who suffer the ill effects of these deadly bacteria.

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Biochemist Yingfu Li and his research team have developed a simple test that can swiftly and accurately identify specific pathogens using a system that will 'hunt' for bacteria, identifying their harmful presence before they have a chance to contaminate our food and water.

Like any living thing, bacteria have their own spoor, leaving behind DNA trails of bacterial 'droppings'. Li tracks these metabolic by-products with molecular beacons -- little lighthouses on a molecular scale that actually light up when they detect the DNA sequence left behind.

Li created a DNAzyme sensor that will be able to identify any bacteria, utilizing a method that doesn't require the steps and specialized equipment typically used to identify whether or not harmful bacteria are present.

"Current methods of foodborne bacterial detection take time. The five days it takes to detect listeria, for example, can translate into an outbreak that costs lives. We have developed a universal test that uses less complex procedures but still generates precise and accurate results," says Li, a Canada Research Chair in Directed Evolution of Nucleic Acids.

Li's fluorescent test system was highlighted in Angewandte Chemie International Edition. Li's paper, co-authored with lab members Monsur Ali, Sergio Aguirre and Hadeer Lazim, was designated a 'hot paper' by Angewandte's editors for its "importance in a rapidly evolving field of current interest."

"McMaster researchers are known for their ability to provide solutions to problems that impact the public's well-being. The test that Professor Li has developed will help safeguard the health of Canadians, and supply industry with a reliable means to bring safe food products to consumers and reduce their time to market," said Mo Elbestawi, vice-president, research and international affairs.

Li's research was funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Sentinel Bioactive Paper Network.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by McMaster University. The original article was written by Danelle D'Alvise. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. M. Monsur Ali, Sergio D. Aguirre, Hadeer Lazim, Yingfu Li. Fluorogenic DNAzyme Probes as Bacterial Indicators. Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 2011; 50 (16): 3751 DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100477

Cite This Page:

McMaster University. "Hunting for deadly bacteria." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110412143238.htm>.
McMaster University. (2011, May 5). Hunting for deadly bacteria. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110412143238.htm
McMaster University. "Hunting for deadly bacteria." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110412143238.htm (accessed December 17, 2014).

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