Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Researchers reveal 18 novel subtype-dependent genetic variants for autism spectrum disorders and identify potential genetic markers for diagnostic screening

Date:
April 28, 2011
Source:
George Washington University Medical Center
Summary:
By dividing individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) into four subtypes according to similarity of symptoms and reanalyzing existing genome-wide genetic data on these individuals vs. controls, researchers have identified 18 novel and highly significant genetic markers for ASD.

By dividing individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) into four subtypes according to similarity of symptoms and reanalyzing existing genome-wide genetic data on these individuals vs. controls, researchers at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences have identified 18 novel and highly significant genetic markers for ASD. In addition, ten of the variants were associated with more than one ASD subtype, providing partial replication of these genetic markers. This study thus identifies candidate genes for ASD and potential subtype-dependent genetic markers for diagnostic screening.

These findings, published in the April 27 edition of the journal PLoS ONE, demonstrate the increased statistical power to identify significant genetic variants when the heterogeneity of the samples tested is reduced by subtyping and further begin to associate genotype with phenotype.

"By working to tease apart the heterogeneity associated with varying severity of autistic symptoms exhibited by individuals with ASD and examining the resulting subtypes of ASD, we believe that we will continue to make strides in figuring out the genetic contributions to autism," said Valerie Hu, Ph.D., professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at GW's School of Medicine and Health Sciences. "The goal of our research is to identify SNPs associated with a subtype of ASD that rise above the 'noise' of the hundreds of thousands of other SNPs when compared against controls, with the hope that we can identify genetic biomarkers for these disorders as well as clues to the biology of autism."

The researchers first identified genetic variants or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with the degree of severity of various different autistic traits, and then they performed case-control genetic association analyses using these variants and subgroups of autistic individuals who share similar symptoms. This helped the researchers to identify the 18 genetic markers that are associated with four subtypes of ASD, ten of which were associated with more than one ASD subtype. They then examined the minor allele frequencies of the shared SNPs in the respective ASD subtypes and found that the odds ratio is different for each shared SNP, further suggesting genetic heterogeneity among the subtypes.

The study also found that all of the novel variants were located in nonexonic DNA regions that do not code for protein and further identified two SNPs that are associated with differentially expressed genes from an earlier study by Dr. Hu's laboratory, suggesting a possible functional relationship between the SNPs and gene expression levels. Based on these findings, the researchers hypothesized that perhaps the newly identified genetic variants are affecting gene regulatory processes, rather than causing a change in protein structure.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by George Washington University Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Valerie W. Hu, Anjene Addington, Alexander Hyman. Novel Autism Subtype-Dependent Genetic Variants Are Revealed by Quantitative Trait and Subphenotype Association Analyses of Published GWAS Data. PLoS ONE, 2011; 6 (4): e19067 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0019067

Cite This Page:

George Washington University Medical Center. "Researchers reveal 18 novel subtype-dependent genetic variants for autism spectrum disorders and identify potential genetic markers for diagnostic screening." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 April 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110427171517.htm>.
George Washington University Medical Center. (2011, April 28). Researchers reveal 18 novel subtype-dependent genetic variants for autism spectrum disorders and identify potential genetic markers for diagnostic screening. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110427171517.htm
George Washington University Medical Center. "Researchers reveal 18 novel subtype-dependent genetic variants for autism spectrum disorders and identify potential genetic markers for diagnostic screening." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110427171517.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) New research says if you condition yourself to eat healthy foods, eventually you'll crave them instead of junk food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) Researchers say having a cup of coffee then taking a nap is more effective than a nap or coffee alone. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Young Entrepreneurs Get $100,000, If They Quit School

Young Entrepreneurs Get $100,000, If They Quit School

AFP (Aug. 29, 2014) Twenty college-age students are getting 100,000 dollars from a Silicon Valley leader and a chance to live in San Francisco in order to work on the start-up project of their dreams, but they have to quit school first. Duration: 02:20 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Baby Babbling Might Lead To Faster Language Development

Baby Babbling Might Lead To Faster Language Development

Newsy (Aug. 29, 2014) A new study suggests babies develop language skills more quickly if their parents imitate the babies' sounds and expressions and talk to them often. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins