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Pesticide impact: Comparing lab, field-scale results

Date:
June 15, 2011
Source:
American Society of Agronomy
Summary:
Researching the impact of pesticide use is an important task with several methods of collecting data. Which method is best?

Assessing the environmental risk of pesticide use is an important, complex task that requires knowledge of the equilibrium sorption parameter. This helps researchers assess the risk of pesticides leaching into groundwater. For cost-effective assessments, this is usually determined through batch experiments that find the amount of pesticide in test soils as a function of concentration at a constant temperature. These experimental conditions differ considerably from real-world conditions. Thus, the validity of the data collected using this method is widely debated.

Recently, scientists from Germany and New Zealand evaluated parameters from different experiments that used the same pesticides and soils. Using this data, scientists analyzed the relationships between flow velocities of soil water, the residence time of the pesticides in the soil and the sorption parameters. Results from the study were published in the May-June 2011 issue of the Journal of Environmental Quality.

Scientists found that the range of sorption constants increased with increasing water velocity. Only for water velocity values lower than 35 mm/day, the range of sorption constants was between zero and one. Typically, these values have been obtained in field-scale experiments run under unsaturated flow conditions using undisturbed soil columns. The scientists showed that replacing equilibrium constants obtained from standard measurement protocols for pesticide registration purposes would lead to misinterpretation of the data. Experiment operation times greater than one day, with a typical duration of several days to weeks, yield the most realistic results.

According to the authors, it is also important to consider sorption and desorption kinetics. The movement of pesticides into a soil matrix was found to depend strongly on the amount of accessible sorption sites, which is determined by soil water content and soil structure. An understanding of this movement will require experimental protocols that take soil structure and soil moisture content into account when researching the impact of pesticides.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society of Agronomy. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. H. Vereecken, J. Vanderborght, R. Kasteel, M. Spiteller, A. Schδffer, M. Close. Do Lab-Derived Distribution Coefficient Values of Pesticides Match Distribution Coefficient Values Determined from Column and Field-Scale Experiments? A Critical Analysis of Relevant Literature. Journal of Environment Quality, 2011; 40 (3): 879 DOI: 10.2134/jeq2010.0404

Cite This Page:

American Society of Agronomy. "Pesticide impact: Comparing lab, field-scale results." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110615171406.htm>.
American Society of Agronomy. (2011, June 15). Pesticide impact: Comparing lab, field-scale results. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110615171406.htm
American Society of Agronomy. "Pesticide impact: Comparing lab, field-scale results." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110615171406.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

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