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Loudest animal is recorded for the first time

Date:
July 1, 2011
Source:
Society for Experimental Biology
Summary:
The loudest animal on Earth, relative to its body size, is a tiny water boatman, scientists have shown. The sound is within human hearing range and at 99.2 decibels it represents the equivalent of listening to an orchestra play loudly while sitting in the front row.

The water boatman (Micronecta scholtzi), shown at the top left, is only 2mm long but is the loudest animal ever to be recorded, relative to its body size, outperforming all marine and terrestrial species.
Credit: Images courtesy of Dr. Jιrτme Sueur, Musιum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris

Scientists have shown for the first time that the loudest animal on earth, relative to its body size, is the tiny water boatman, Micronecta scholtzi. At 99.2 decibels, this represents the equivalent of listening to an orchestra play loudly while sitting in the front row.

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The frequency of the sound (around 10 kHz) is within human hearing range and Dr. James Windmill of the University of Strathclyde, explains one clue as to how loud the animals are: "Remarkably, even though 99% of sound is lost when transferring from water to air, the song is so loud that a person walking along the bank can actually hear these tiny creatures singing from the bottom of the river."

The song, used by males to attract mates, is produced by rubbing two body parts together, in a process called stridulation. In water boatmen the area used for stridulation is only about 50 micrometres across, roughly the width of a human hair. "We really don't know how they make such a loud sound using such a small area," says Dr. Windmill.

The researchers, who are presenting their work at the Society for Experimental Biology Annual Conference in Glasgow, are now keen to bring together aspects of biology and engineering to clarify how and why such a small animal makes such a loud noise, and to explore the practical applications. Dr. Windmill explains: "Biologically this work could be helpful in conservation as recordings of insect sounds could be used to monitor biodiversity. From the engineering side it could be used to inform our work in acoustics, such as in sonar systems."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for Experimental Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jιrτme Sueur, David Mackie, James F. C. Windmill. So Small, So Loud: Extremely High Sound Pressure Level from a Pygmy Aquatic Insect (Corixidae, Micronectinae). PLoS ONE, 2011; 6 (6): e21089 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0021089

Cite This Page:

Society for Experimental Biology. "Loudest animal is recorded for the first time." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 July 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110701121519.htm>.
Society for Experimental Biology. (2011, July 1). Loudest animal is recorded for the first time. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110701121519.htm
Society for Experimental Biology. "Loudest animal is recorded for the first time." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110701121519.htm (accessed November 21, 2014).

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