Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Seven new mice species discovered

Date:
July 7, 2011
Source:
Florida State University
Summary:
After living incognito for millions of years in a remote area of a forested mountain range in the Philippines, seven new-found species of mice owe their recent discovery to DNA evidence and the biologist who deciphered it.

Five of the seven newly discovered Philippine forest mice species, all from the genus Apomys, with species names as follows: (A) Apomys zambalensis sp. nov. (B) A. brownorum sp. nov. (C and D) A. sierrae sp. nov. (from Mt. Cetaceo and Mt. Palali, respectively) (E) A. minganensis sp. nov. (F) A. aurorae sp. nov.
Credit: Drawing by Velizar Simeonovski

After living incognito for millions of years in a remote area of a forested mountain range in the Philippines, seven newfound species of mice owe their recent discovery to DNA evidence and the Florida State University biologist who deciphered it.

What's more, the DNA drawn from the reclusive "new" mammals told FSU Associate Professor Scott J. Steppan an unusual evolutionary story. As he analyzed and compared the genetic codes of mice found in separate but proximate parts of a small area on Luzon, the largest Philippine island, he determined that while each mouse was a distinct species, they all belonged to the forest-mouse genus Apomys. That meant all seven mice were both "new" and closely related to one another.

"It is extraordinary, really almost unprecedented, to have so many closely related mammal species from such a small area that forms just one-half of one island -- let alone to have discovered so many so quickly," said Steppan, whose laboratory at Florida State coordinates the DNA sequencing portion of an ongoing biodiversity project led by Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History.

Part of an international team of biologists collaborating on the project, Steppan and colleagues from the United States and the Philippines describe the newly discovered species in Fieldiana, the Field Museum's peer-reviewed journal.

"The Apomys genus is the product of millions of years of evolution in the Philippine archipelago," Steppan said, "but it also shows how very fast the process of evolution has been operating there, in terms of creating new species. Such cases of rapid diversification are useful examples to help us understand the origin of biodiversity in general."

Steppan's identification of the mice has made a marked difference in the number of mammal species (excluding bats) now known to be native to Luzon, increasing the current, official total by about 17 percent, from 42 to 49.

He said that, while the new Apomys species may have been elusive until now, they aren't rare. Rather, some are among the most abundant mammals in their respective forests and, as such, are vital to the local ecosystem, which acts as a watershed for the human communities. The seed- and earthworm-eating mice were hard to find primarily because of their extremely limited geographic ranges.

Unfortunately, their limited ranges make them susceptible to extinction from deforestation, a major problem in the Philippines and other tropical regions. That vulnerability concerns scientists because the animals are a key part of the Philippines' rich biodiversity.

And when it comes to biodiversity, Steppan said not even famous island chains such as the Galapagos Islands can trump the Philippines -- which, relative to its size, encompasses Earth's greatest concentration of unique species of animals.

In fact, he believes there's no end to the discoveries that await biologists there.

In the past decade alone, colleagues of Steppan's have identified a total of 10 newfound mammal species in the Philippines, while other scientists have described five more.

Soon the list may grow even longer. Steppan recently led new DNA studies that have produced promising, though not-yet-published, results.

In addition to Steppan of Florida State, co-authors of the current Fieldiana paper include project leader Lawrence Heaney of the Field Museum and researchers from the University of the Philippines; the Philippine National Museum; Conservation International-Philippines; and the Utah Museum of Natural History.

A Florida State University undergraduate researcher also played a significant role. Steppan credits then-FSU student Lawren VandeVrede for much of the Apomys DNA sequencing performed in his laboratory. VandeVrede is now pursuing both a medical and a doctoral degree at the University of Illinois-Chicago.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Florida State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Lawrence R. Heaney, Danilo S. Balete, Eric A. Rickart, Phillip A. Alviola, Mariano Roy M. Duya, Melizar V. Duya, M. Josefa Veluz, Lawren VandeVrede, Scott J. Steppan. Chapter 1: Seven New Species and a New Subgenus of Forest Mice (Rodentia: Muridae: Apomys) from Luzon Island. Fieldiana Life and Earth Sciences, 2011; 2: 1 DOI: 10.3158/2158-5520-2.1.1

Cite This Page:

Florida State University. "Seven new mice species discovered." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 July 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110707111036.htm>.
Florida State University. (2011, July 7). Seven new mice species discovered. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110707111036.htm
Florida State University. "Seven new mice species discovered." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110707111036.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Raw: Thousands Flocking to German Crop Circle

Raw: Thousands Flocking to German Crop Circle

AP (July 30, 2014) Thousands of people are trekking to a Bavarian farmer's field to check out a mysterious set of crop circles. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

AFP (July 30, 2014) Pan-African airline ASKY has suspended all flights to and from the capitals of Liberia and Sierra Leone amid the worsening Ebola health crisis, which has so far caused 672 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Duration: 00:43 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
At Least 20 Chikungunya Cases in New Jersey

At Least 20 Chikungunya Cases in New Jersey

AP (July 30, 2014) At least 20 New Jersey residents have tested positive for chikungunya, a mosquito-borne virus that has spread through the Caribbean. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Xtreme Eating: Your Daily Caloric Intake All On One Plate

Xtreme Eating: Your Daily Caloric Intake All On One Plate

Newsy (July 30, 2014) The Center for Science in the Public Interest released its 2014 list of single meals with whopping calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins