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Vitamin D lower in NFL football players who suffered muscled injuries, study suggests

Date:
July 11, 2011
Source:
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine
Summary:
Vitamin D deficiency has been known to cause an assortment of health problems. Now, a new study suggests that lack of the vitamin might also increase the chance of muscle injuries in athletes, specifically NFL football players.

Vitamin D deficiency has been known to cause an assortment of health problems. Now, a recent study -- being presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in San Diego -- suggests that lack of the vitamin might also increase the chance of muscle injuries in athletes, specifically NFL football players.

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"Eighty percent of the football team we studied had vitamin D insufficiency. African American players and players who suffered muscle injuries had significantly lower levels," said Michael Shindle, MD, lead researcher and member of Summit Medical Group.

Researchers identified 89 football players from a single NFL team and provided laboratory testing of vitamin D levels in the spring 2010 as part of routine pre-season evaluations. The mean age of the players was 25. The team provided data to determine the number of players who had lost time due to muscle injuries. Vitamin D levels were then classified based on player race and time lost due to muscle injury.

Twenty-seven players had deficient levels (< 20 ng/ML) and an additional 45 had levels consistent with insufficiency (20-31.9 ng/mL). Seventeen players had values within normal limits (>32 ng/mL). The mean vitamin D level in white players was 30.3 ng/mL while the mean level for black players was 20.4 ng/mL. Sixteen players suffered a muscle injury with a mean vitamin D level of 19.9.

"Screening and treatment of vitamin D insufficiency in professional athletes may be a simple way to help prevent injuries," said Dr. Scott Rodeo, MD, Co-Chief of the Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service at the Hospital for Special Surgery. "Further research also needs to be conducted in order to determine if increasing vitamin D leads to improved maximum muscle function," said Dr. Joseph Lane, MD, Director of the Metabolic Bone Disease Service at the Hospital for Special Surgery."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. "Vitamin D lower in NFL football players who suffered muscled injuries, study suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 July 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110710132807.htm>.
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. (2011, July 11). Vitamin D lower in NFL football players who suffered muscled injuries, study suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 21, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110710132807.htm
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. "Vitamin D lower in NFL football players who suffered muscled injuries, study suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110710132807.htm (accessed April 21, 2015).

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