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Antarctic killer whales may seek spa-like relief in the tropics

Date:
October 27, 2011
Source:
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service
Summary:
In a new study, researchers offer a novel explanation for why a type of Antarctic killer whale performs a rapid migration to warmer tropical waters. One tagged Antarctic killer whale monitored by satellite traveled over 5,000 miles to visit the warm waters off southern Brazil before returning immediately to Antarctica just 42 days later. This was the first long distance migration ever reported for killer whales.

Pod of killer whales.
Credit: pr2is / Fotolia

NOAA researchers offer a novel explanation for why a type of Antarctic killer whale performs a rapid migration to warmer tropical waters. Scientists believe that warmer waters help the whales regenerate skin faster, after spending months coated with algae in colder waters.

"The whales are traveling so quickly, and in such a consistent track, that it is unlikely they are foraging for food or giving birth," said John Durban, lead author from NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center in La Jolla, California. "We believe these movements are likely undertaken to help the whales regenerate skin tissue in a warmer environment with less heat loss."

As evidence, the researchers point to the yellowish coating on Antarctic killer whales caused by a thick accumulation of diatoms or algae on the outer skin of the animals. The coloring is noticeably absent when they return from warmer waters indicating the upper epidermis of the skin has been shed.

One tagged Antarctic killer whale monitored by satellite traveled over 5,000 miles to visit the warm waters off southern Brazil before returning immediately to Antarctica just 42 days later. This was the first long distance migration ever reported for killer whales.

The coloring is noticeably absent when they return from warmer waters indicating the upper layer of skin has been shed. The scientists tagged 12 Type B killer whales (seal-feeding specialists) near the Antarctic Peninsula and tracked 5 that revealed consistent movement to sub-tropical waters. The whales tended to slow in the warmest waters although there was no obvious interruption in swim speed or direction to indicate calving or prolonged feeding.

"They went to the edge of the tropics at high speed, turned around and came straight back to Antarctica, at the onset of winter," said Robert Pitman, co-author of the study. "The standard feeding or breeding migration does not seem to apply here."

Researchers believe there are at least three different types of killer whales in Antarctica and have labeled them Types A, B and C.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. J. W. Durban, R. L. Pitman. Antarctic killer whales make rapid, round-trip movements to subtropical waters: evidence for physiological maintenance migrations? Biology Letters, 2011; DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2011.0875

Cite This Page:

NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service. "Antarctic killer whales may seek spa-like relief in the tropics." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 October 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111026113824.htm>.
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service. (2011, October 27). Antarctic killer whales may seek spa-like relief in the tropics. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111026113824.htm
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service. "Antarctic killer whales may seek spa-like relief in the tropics." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111026113824.htm (accessed September 20, 2014).

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