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'Lost world' discovered around Antarctic vents

Date:
January 4, 2012
Source:
University of Oxford
Summary:
Communities of species previously unknown to science have been discovered on the seafloor near Antarctica, clustered in the hot, dark environment surrounding hydrothermal vents. The discoveries include new species of yeti crab, starfish, barnacles, sea anemones, and potentially an octopus.

Unidentified pale octopus on the seafloor.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Oxford

Communities of species previously unknown to science have been discovered on the seafloor near Antarctica, clustered in the hot, dark environment surrounding hydrothermal vents.

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The discoveries, made by teams led by the University of Oxford, University of Southampton, the National Oceanography Centre, and British Antarctic Survey, include new species of yeti crab, starfish, barnacles, and sea anemones, and even an octopus probably new to science.

For the first time researchers, using a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV), have been able to explore the East Scotia Ridge deep beneath the Southern Ocean where hydrothermal vents, including 'black smokers' reaching temperatures of up to 382 degrees Celsius, create a unique environment lacking sunlight but rich in certain chemicals.

The team report their findings in this week's PLoS Biology.

'Hydrothermal vents are home to animals found nowhere else on the planet that get their energy not from the Sun but from breaking down chemicals, such as hydrogen sulphide,' said Professor Alex Rogers of Oxford University's Department of Zoology, who led the research. 'The first survey of these particular vents, in the Southern Ocean near Antarctica, has revealed a hot, dark, 'lost world' in which whole communities of previously unknown marine organisms thrive.'

Highlights from the ROV dives include images showing huge colonies of the new species of yeti crab, thought to dominate the Antarctic vent ecosystem, clustered around vent chimneys. Elsewhere the ROV spotted numbers of an undescribed predatory seastar with seven arms crawling across fields of stalked barnacles and found an unidentified pale octopus nearly 2,400 metres down on the seafloor.

'What we didn't find is almost as surprising as what we did,' said Professor Rogers. 'Many animals such as tubeworms, vent mussels, vent crabs, and vent shrimps, found in hydrothermal vents in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans, simply weren't there.'

The team believe that the differences between the groups of animals found around the Antarctic vents and those found around vents elsewhere suggest that the Southern Ocean may act as a barrier to some vent animals. The unique species of the East Scotia Ridge also suggest that, globally, vent ecosystems may be much more diverse, and their interactions more complex, than previously thought.

In April Professor Rogers was part of an international panel of marine scientists who gathered at Somerville College, Oxford to consider the latest research on the world's oceans. A preliminary report from the panel in June warned that the world's oceans are at risk of entering a phase of extinction of marine species unprecedented in human history.

'These findings are yet more evidence of the precious diversity to be found throughout the world's oceans,' said Professor Rogers. 'Everywhere we look, whether it is in the sunlit coral reefs of tropical waters or these Antarctic vents shrouded in eternal darkness, we find unique ecosystems that we need to understand and protect.'

ROV dives were conducted with the help of the crews of RRS James Cook and RRS James Clark Ross. The discoveries were made as part of a consortium project with partners from the University of Oxford, University of Southampton, University of Bristol, Newcastle University, British Antarctic Survey, National Oceanography Centre, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution supported by the UK's Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the US National Science Foundation (NSF).

A report of the research, entitled 'The discovery of new deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities in the Southern Ocean and implications for biogeography', is published this week in PLoS Biology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Oxford. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Alex D. Rogers, Paul A. Tyler, Douglas P. Connelly, Jon T. Copley, Rachael James, Robert D. Larter, Katrin Linse, Rachel A. Mills, Alfredo Naveira Garabato, Richard D. Pancost, David A. Pearce, Nicholas V. C. Polunin, Christopher R. German, Timothy Shank, Philipp H. Boersch-Supan, Belinda J. Alker, Alfred Aquilina, Sarah A. Bennett, Andrew Clarke, Robert J. J. Dinley, Alastair G. C. Graham, Darryl R. H. Green, Jeffrey A. Hawkes, Laura Hepburn, Ana Hilario, Veerle A. I. Huvenne, Leigh Marsh, Eva Ramirez-Llodra, William D. K. Reid, Christopher N. Roterman, Christopher J. Sweeting, Sven Thatje, Katrin Zwirglmaier. The Discovery of New Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Communities in the Southern Ocean and Implications for Biogeography. PLoS Biology, 2012; 10 (1): e1001234 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001234

Cite This Page:

University of Oxford. "'Lost world' discovered around Antarctic vents." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 January 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120103185246.htm>.
University of Oxford. (2012, January 4). 'Lost world' discovered around Antarctic vents. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120103185246.htm
University of Oxford. "'Lost world' discovered around Antarctic vents." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120103185246.htm (accessed March 28, 2015).

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