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Quest for sugars involved in origin of life

Date:
February 16, 2012
Source:
Elhuyar Fundazioa
Summary:
Researchers have managed to isolate a sugar – a ribose –  in gas phase and to characterize a number of its structures. Sugars give rise to enormous biochemical interest given the importance and diversity of the functions they carry out: they act as an energy storage system and serve as fuel for a number of biological systems; they form part of DNA and of ribonucleic acid (RNA) and, moreover, play a key role in cell processes. Recently interest in sugars has also been increasingly attracting the attention of cosmochemistry, more concretely, in the search for the fundamental matter of the origin of life in interstellar space.

Team from the Department of Physical Chemistry of the University of the Basque Country led bay Mr Emilio José Cocinero.
Credit: Image courtesy of Elhuyar Fundazioa

Team from University of the Basque Country manage to isolate a sugar -- a ribose -- in gas phase and to characterise a number of its structures.

Sugars give rise to enormous biochemical interest given the importance and diversity of the functions they carry out: they act as an energy storage system and serve as fuel for a number of biological systems; they form part of DNA and of ribonucleic acid (RNA) and, moreover, play a key role in cell processes. Recently interest in sugars has also been increasingly attracting the attention of cosmochemistry, more concretely, in the search for the fundamental matter of the origin of life in interstellar space.

Finding this would also help in the understanding of what the mechanism of the origin of life on Earth was. The most elemental of sugars, made up of 2 and 3 units of carbon, have already been found in interstellar molecular clouds and meteorites. Nevertheless, it has not been possible to date to detect more complex sugars in space, given the absence of precise information about their structure. This information is what the research laboratories have to provide.

There are numerous research teams to be first in the race to detect this sugar in gas phase, using high-resolution techniques. Problems have arisen in trying to vaporise it due to the thermal instabilities caused by loss of water. "Only if you avoid the processes of decomposition on dehydration and manage to isolate the sugar, thus obviating the changes produced by neighbouring molecules, will you be in a position to characterise its structure," explained Mr Emilio José Cocinero, researcher at the Department of Physical Chemistry of the University of the Basque Country (UPV-EHU). His latest research has become amongst the first worldwide to have managed to observe a sugar -- a ribose -- in the gas phase and to characterise a number of its structures. His article, "Ribose Found in the Gas Phase", published by the Angewandte Chemie International Edition, was announced on the front cover of the April issue of the scientific journal and also highlighted in the online version.

Participating in the research, led by Mr Cocinero, was Ms Patricia Écija, Mr Francisco José Basterretxea, Mr José Andrés Fernández and Mr Fernando Castaño, from the UPV/EHU, with the collaboration of Mr Alberto Lesarri from the University of Valladolid and of Jens-Uwe Grabow, from the University of Hannover (Germany), being undertaken in its totality with the team formed at the Basque university.

In concrete, in order to observe the ribose in gas phase, microwave spectroscopy was used combined with ultra-rapid laser vaporisation with ultraviolet light. Not only was it isolated and observed, but six different structures of the ribose were detected.

"Sugars are super flexible molecules that can take on many different configurations. We have managed to detect the six most stable structures of the free ribose," explained the lead researcher. However, all the structures detected show rings of six members, i.e. the structures involved are very different from those shown in RNA or ADNA ribose or its derivatives, where the rings are five-membered. "Given that the genetic material has a different configuration, it is unlikely that the first living beings had ribose. Thermal instability and the preference for 6-member rings would appear to exclude the possibility that the first genetic material was made up of this sugar," concluded Mr Cocinero. With this door opened to the study of sugars in gas phase, it will be "easier" to obtain information on the role of sugars in the origin of the first living beings.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Elhuyar Fundazioa. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Emilio J. Cocinero, Alberto Lesarri, Patricia Écija, Francisco J. Basterretxea, Jens-Uwe Grabow, José A. Fernández, Fernando Castaño. Ribose Found in the Gas Phase. Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 2011; DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107973
  2. Emilio J. Cocinero, Alberto Lesarri, Patricia Écija, Francisco J. Basterretxea, Jens-Uwe Grabow, José A. Fernández, Fernando Castaño. Ribose Found in the Gas Phase. Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 2012; DOI: 10.1002/anie.201109101

Cite This Page:

Elhuyar Fundazioa. "Quest for sugars involved in origin of life." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 February 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120216111530.htm>.
Elhuyar Fundazioa. (2012, February 16). Quest for sugars involved in origin of life. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120216111530.htm
Elhuyar Fundazioa. "Quest for sugars involved in origin of life." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120216111530.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

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