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Scientists create artificial mother of pearl

Date:
July 24, 2012
Source:
University of Cambridge
Summary:
Mimicking the way mother of pearl is created in nature, scientists have for the first time synthesized the strong, iridescent coating found on the inside of some mollusks.

Abalone shells. Mimicking the way mother of pearl is created in nature, scientists have for the first time synthesized the strong, iridescent coating found on the inside of some molluscs.
Credit: kaowenhua / Fotolia

Mimicking the way mother of pearl is created in nature, scientists have for the first time synthesized the strong, iridescent coating found on the inside of some molluscs.

The research was published July 24 in the journal Nature Communications.

Nacre, also called mother of pearl, is the iridescent coating that is found on the inside of some molluscs and on the outer coating of pearls. By recreating the biological steps that form nacre in molluscs, the scientists were able to manufacture a material which has a similar structure, mechanical behavior, and optical appearance of that found in nature.

In order to create the artificial nacre, the scientists followed three steps. First, they had to take preventative measure to ensure the calcium carbonate, which is the primary component of nacre, does not crystallize when precipitating from the solution. This is done by using a mixture of ions and organic components in the solution that mimics how molluscs control this. The precipitate can then be adsorbed to surfaces, forming layers of well-defined thickness.

Next, the precipitate layer is covered by an organic layer that has 10-nm wide pores, which is done in a synthetic procedure invented by co-author Alex Finnemore. Finally, crystallization is induced, and all steps are repeated to create a stack of alternating crystalline and organic layers.

Professor Ulli Steiner, of the Department of Physics' Cavendish Laboratory at the University of Cambridge, said: "Crystals have a characteristic shape that reflects their atomic structure, and it is very difficult to modify this shape. Nature is, however, able to do this, and through our research we were able to gain insight into how it grows these materials. Essentially, we have created a new recipe for mother of pearl using nature's cookbook."

Alex Finnemore, also of the Department of Physics' Cavendish Laboratory, said: "While many composite engineering materials outperform nacre, its synthesis entirely at ambient temperatures in an aqueous environment, as well as its cheap ingredients, may make it interesting for coating applications. Once optimized, the process is simple and can easily be automated."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Cambridge. The original story is licensed under a Creative Commons license. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Alexander Finnemore, Pedro Cunha, Tamaryn Shean, Silvia Vignolini, Stefan Guldin, Michelle Oyen, Ullrich Steiner. Biomimetic layer-by-layer assembly of artificial nacre. Nature Communications, 2012; 3: 966 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms1970

Cite This Page:

University of Cambridge. "Scientists create artificial mother of pearl." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120724115013.htm>.
University of Cambridge. (2012, July 24). Scientists create artificial mother of pearl. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120724115013.htm
University of Cambridge. "Scientists create artificial mother of pearl." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120724115013.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

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