Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Gene suppression can reduce cold-induced sweetening in potatoes

Date:
October 15, 2012
Source:
USDA/Agricultural Research Service
Summary:
Preventing activity of a key enzyme in potatoes could help boost potato quality by putting an end to cold-induced sweetening, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture scientists.

Preventing activity of a key enzyme in potatoes could help boost potato quality by putting an end to cold-induced sweetening, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists.

Related Articles


Cold-induced sweetening, which occurs when potatoes are put in long-term cold storage, causes flavor changes and unwanted dark colors in fried and roasted potatoes. But long-term cold storage is necessary to maintain an adequate supply of potatoes throughout the year.

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists found that during cold storage, an enzyme called invertase causes changes in potato sugars -- more accumulation of sucrose and a corresponding increase in the amount of glucose and fructose in tubers stored at very low temperatures.

At the ARS Vegetable Crops Research Unit in Madison, Wis., plant physiologist Paul Bethke, geneticist Shelley Jansky, and technician Andy Hamernik used a recently developed technology to show that decreasing the activity of invertase is sufficient to enable cold storage of potatoes without compromising the appearance of potato chips or the growth characteristics of the potato plants.

Bethke and his colleagues are using molecular tools to improve understanding of what is controlling the process of cold-induced sweetening. Potatoes are sensitive to their environment and highly sensitive to low temperatures, and respond to these temperatures by producing certain sugars called "reducing sugars," primarily glucose and fructose. When chips or fries are made from these potatoes, they tend to be dark-colored and bitter. The scientists' research paper in Plant Physiology provides a proof of concept that the invertase enzyme is critically important in the process.

However, invertase's level of importance has never been clear, because there are other biochemical steps that might also contribute, according to Bethke.

Read more about this research in the October 2012 issue of Agricultural Research magazine: http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/AR/archive/oct12/fruits1012.htm

ARS is USDA's principal intramural scientific research agency, and the research supports the USDA priority of promoting international food security.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by USDA/Agricultural Research Service. The original article was written by Sharon Durham. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. P. B. Bhaskar, L. Wu, J. S. Busse, B. R. Whitty, A. J. Hamernik, S. H. Jansky, C. R. Buell, P. C. Bethke, J. Jiang. Suppression of the Vacuolar Invertase Gene Prevents Cold-Induced Sweetening in Potato. Plant Physiology, 2010; 154 (2): 939 DOI: 10.1104/pp.110.162545

Cite This Page:

USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "Gene suppression can reduce cold-induced sweetening in potatoes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121015131809.htm>.
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. (2012, October 15). Gene suppression can reduce cold-induced sweetening in potatoes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121015131809.htm
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "Gene suppression can reduce cold-induced sweetening in potatoes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121015131809.htm (accessed January 29, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Thursday, January 29, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Brawling Pandas Are Violently Adorable

Brawling Pandas Are Violently Adorable

Buzz60 (Jan. 29, 2015) Video of pandas play fighting at the Chengdu Research Base in China will make your day. Mara Montalbano (@maramontalbano) shows us. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Researchers Say We Should Cut Back On Biofuels

Why Researchers Say We Should Cut Back On Biofuels

Newsy (Jan. 29, 2015) Biofuels aren&apos;t the best alternative to fossil fuels, according to a new report. In fact, they&apos;re quite a bad one. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
3-D Printed Wheelchair Helps Two-Legged Dog Learn to Run

3-D Printed Wheelchair Helps Two-Legged Dog Learn to Run

Buzz60 (Jan. 29, 2015) 3-D printing helps another two-legged dog run around with his four-legged friends. Jen Markham (@jenmarkham) has the adorable video. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dogs Bring on So Many Different Emotions in Their Human Best Friends

Dogs Bring on So Many Different Emotions in Their Human Best Friends

RightThisMinute (Jan. 28, 2015) From new-puppy happy tears to helpful-grocery-carrying-dog laughter, our four-legged best friends can make us feel the entire spectrum of emotions. Video provided by RightThisMinute
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins