Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Lung mucus gel scaffold prevents nanoparticles from getting through

Date:
October 23, 2012
Source:
Saarland University
Summary:
Scientists have unraveled lung mucus's physical properties: They discovered that a rigid gel scaffold in lung mucus separates large, fluid-filled pores and prevents nanoparticle movement beyond individual pore boundaries. Their findings deepen our understanding of diseases of the respiratory system, notably infections, and support the development of new inhaled medications.

Scientists at the Saarland University and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) unraveled lung mucus's physical properties: They discovered that a rigid gel scaffold in lung mucus separates large, fluid-filled pores and prevents nanoparticle movement beyond individual pore boundaries. Their findings deepen our understanding of diseases of the respiratory system, notably infections, and support the development of new inhaled medications.

The researchers published their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS).

Mucus coats our airways' internal surfaces. The viscous gel humidifies the lungs and prevents viruses and other small particles like diesel soot from entering the body unchecked. Previously unclear was the extent to which such nanoparticles are able to move through the lungs' mucus. Here, the research evidence was contradictory. Scientists could not explain why, in inhaled medication development, drug nanoparticles often simply got stuck in the mucus never making it to their target destination inside the lung cells.

Now, as part of a German Research Foundation (DFG)-funded study, pharmacists and physicists were finally able to shed light on this dilemma. Scientists from the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS), a branch of the HZI, together with researchers from the Saarland University, the Universitι Paris-Diderot, and Fresenius Medical Care Germany collaborated on the study. "The mucus inside the lungs is a very special kind of gel. Its structure is very different from other gels," explains Claus-Michael Lehr, Professor for Biopharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology at the Saarland University and head of the "Drug Delivery" Department at HIPS. "Normal" gels have a microstructure that resembles a delicate spiderweb made from thin, very fine threads that enclose small pores. When viewed under the microscope, lung mucus, by comparison, looks more like a sponge, with rigid, thick gel rods separating large pores filled with liquid gel. "These scaffold proteins are called mucins," explains Professor Lehr. The researchers have now shown that nanoparticles become stuck at these structures as though they were bars of a cage. The explanation for why many investigations found nanoparticles in the mucus to be highly mobile is because the research was done on a nanometer scale. Inside the pores, the particles can move around completely unobstructed and only when they try to move past individual pores are they prevented from doing so by the "bars."

"Our results are helping us to better understand the etiology of infectious diseases of the airways and how to treat them more effectively. In particular, they represent an important basis for the continued development of new inhaled medications," explains Professor Lehr. The newly gained insights show that it is important to consider how drugs overcome the mucus gel scaffold. Mucolytic techniques can be used where, essentially, the rods are melted such that they dissolve before the nanoparticle and, once the particle has passed, they fuse again.

One of the research tools Professor Christian Wagner and his team of experimental physicists at the Saarland University use to support their assumptions are optical tweezers: Bundled laser beams are used to grab and move the smallest particles just like you would use a regular pair of tweezers. "We can use the optical tweezers' laser beams to measure the force that is required to move a particle within the gel. This allows us to make conclusions about the medium that the bead is moved through," explains Professor Wagner. "We were able to pull the bead through the liquid inside the pore at a constant force -- just as we would if we were dealing with a normal gel. However, whenever the bead hits the pore's wall, in other words the mucus's gel rods, the laser beam is unable to move it any further," explains Wagner. Experiments using an atomic force microscope as well as other tests are further supporting their hypothesis: As such, iron nanoparticles were able to penetrate the "normal" reference gel but not the lung mucus without any difficulties under the influence of a magnetic field. Structural analyses of the mucus were performed by scientists at Fresenius Medical Care Germany using a cryo-electron microscope.

The researchers expect that insights into the special structure of lung mucus will help guiding the development of a new generation of drugs to treat diseases of the airways.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Saarland University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. J. Kirch, A. Schneider, B. Abou, A. Hopf, U. F. Schaefer, M. Schneider, C. Schall, C. Wagner, C.-M. Lehr. Optical tweezers reveal relationship between microstructure and nanoparticle penetration of pulmonary mucus. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2012; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1214066109

Cite This Page:

Saarland University. "Lung mucus gel scaffold prevents nanoparticles from getting through." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121023090522.htm>.
Saarland University. (2012, October 23). Lung mucus gel scaffold prevents nanoparticles from getting through. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121023090522.htm
Saarland University. "Lung mucus gel scaffold prevents nanoparticles from getting through." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121023090522.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Working Mother (Oct. 22, 2014) — Is your child ready? Video provided by Working Mother
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.S. Issues Ebola Travel Restrictions, Are Visa Bans Next?

U.S. Issues Ebola Travel Restrictions, Are Visa Bans Next?

Newsy (Oct. 22, 2014) — Now that the U.S. is restricting travel from West Africa, some are dropping questions about a travel ban and instead asking about visa bans. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
US to Track Everyone Coming from Ebola Nations

US to Track Everyone Coming from Ebola Nations

AP (Oct. 22, 2014) — Stepping up their vigilance against Ebola, federal authorities said Wednesday that everyone traveling into the US from Ebola-stricken nations will be monitored for symptoms for 21 days. (Oct. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctors Help Paralysed Man Walk Again, Patient in Disbelief

Doctors Help Paralysed Man Walk Again, Patient in Disbelief

AFP (Oct. 22, 2014) — Polish doctors describe how they helped a paralysed man walk again, with the patient in disbelief at the return of sensation to his legs. Duration: 1:04 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins