Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Nutrition: Help for children to resist unhealthy temptations

Date:
November 30, 2012
Source:
Aarhus University
Summary:
It is easy for children and teenagers to get their hands on sweets and other unhealthy foods. A major research project has therefore developed a range of tools that children and teenagers can use to ward off temptation.

Children and young people in Europe are exposed to all kinds of fast food, potato chips and fizzy drinks -- so how can they learn to resist the temptation to indulge? This is the question that the European research project TEMPEST was set up to answer. The research project involves researchers from nine European countries and one of the team members is Liliya Nureeva, a PhD student at Aarhus University.

The TEMPEST research project has prepared strategies for children to use to suppress or control their desire to scoff sweets and snacks. One of the main objectives of the project is to contribute to dealing with the increasing problem of overweight among children and teenagers in Europe by providing the target group members with tools they can use to avoid the unhealthy foods that is so readily available to them.

"Children and teenagers need to know more about health and the tools available so that they themselves can become involved in defining their diets and eating habits," explains Liliya Nureeva from the Department of Business Administration at Aarhus University.

Tools to help resist temptation

The researchers have designed a number of strategies based on the data collected from nine European countries. One consistent theme in the project is that children are to be involved in integrating the strategies into their everyday lives and thus play an active role in their own health and lifestyle.

"Some children find it easiest to control their dietary habits simply by avoiding unhealthy snacks altogether, while others prefer to use distractions to forget their desire for sweet treats. Still others prepare their own rules stating that they have to eat some fresh fruit every day, or that they are only allowed to eat sweets at weekends," explains Liliya Nureeva, who continues:

"Children need to be aware of the strategies that work for them, as this will allow them to take active steps to control their intake of unhealthy foods."

Strategies for children

Highlighting the unhealthy parts of children's and teenagers' lifestyles and then finding strategies to help them change their ways is a very complex problem. For example, it involves building up knowledge about what people find tempting -- and when -- and then identifying ways to avoid or resist the temptation. The next step is to establish how to set goals and rules to help break away from the unhealthy lifestyle.

According to Liliya Nureeva, parents, school teachers and others who are in close contact with children and teenagers may tell them about the different strategies and explain how they can integrate these strategies into their everyday lives.

At the end of this year, TEMPEST will be publishing a handbook that will be available to parents and others able to help children use the strategies actively.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Aarhus University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Aarhus University. "Nutrition: Help for children to resist unhealthy temptations." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 November 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121130110656.htm>.
Aarhus University. (2012, November 30). Nutrition: Help for children to resist unhealthy temptations. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121130110656.htm
Aarhus University. "Nutrition: Help for children to resist unhealthy temptations." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121130110656.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Newsy (July 24, 2014) Sheik Umar Khan has treated many of the people infected in the Ebola outbreak, and now he's become one of them. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Condemned Man's US Execution Takes Nearly Two Hours

Condemned Man's US Execution Takes Nearly Two Hours

AFP (July 24, 2014) America's death penalty debate raged Thursday after it took nearly two hours for Arizona to execute a prisoner who lost a Supreme Court battle challenging the experimental lethal drug cocktail. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) A study by German researchers claims watching TV while you're stressed out can make you feel guilty and like a failure. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

      Environment News

        Technology News



          Save/Print:
          Share:

          Free Subscriptions


          Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

          Get Social & Mobile


          Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

          Have Feedback?


          Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
          Mobile: iPhone Android Web
          Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
          Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
          Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins