Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Remote sensing, microbiology used to trace foodborne pathogens

Date:
December 5, 2012
Source:
Cornell University
Summary:
In 2011, an outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes in cantaloupe led to almost 150 illnesses and 30 deaths. With a spate of recent outbreaks of such foodborne pathogens as Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing E. coli and L. monocytogenes, the ability to predict where and how these deadly microbes enter the food supply chain could save lives and prevent disease.

Esther Fortes, a member of the Cornell Produce Sampling Team, collects a water sample from a stream located adjacent to one of the produce fields used in the study.
Credit: Laura Strawn

In 2011, an outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes in cantaloupe led to almost 150 illnesses and 30 deaths. With a spate of recent outbreaks of such foodborne pathogens as Salmonella , Shiga toxin-producing E. coli and L. monocytogenes , the ability to predict where and how these deadly microbes enter the food supply chain could save lives and prevent disease.

Related Articles


Cornell researchers have created a method that uses geospatial algorithms, foodborne pathogen ecology and Geographic Information System (GIS) tools to predict hot spots where these pathogens may be present and spread on farms prior to harvest. Many of the recent outbreaks of foodborne pathogens have been linked to contamination on the farm.

The method, which can be applied to any farm, uses classification tree tools with remotely sensed data, such as topography, soil type, weather trends, proximity to various sources (water, forests) and more, to predict areas where pathogens are likely to be present.

"We wanted to see if we could identify factors that gave us a higher or lower prevalence of finding these pathogens," said Laura Strawn, a graduate student in the field of food science and lead author of a study published online Nov. 9 in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. "We can look at a farm and use this data analysis tool to tell the farmer where these hotspots may be for foodborne pathogens," she said.

"These tools are likely to provide a completely new science-based approach for guidance on how to reduce the likelihood of contamination with these bacteria," said co-author Martin Wiedmann, a food science professor and study co-author.

By knowing where the hot spots are, farmers may then implement such preventive practices as draining standing water, adjusting where livestock graze, or planting crops that should be consumed cooked rather than raw, for example, Strawn added.

The researchers collected 588 samples soil, water, feces and drag swabs (gauze attached to a string and dragged over a field) from four produce fields on five farms each. Samples were collected four times a year, during each season, from 2009 to 2011. The prevalence of L. monocytogenes , Salmonella and E. coli were 15.0, 4.6 and 2.7 percent respectively across all the samples. L. monocytogenes and Salmonella were detected more frequently in water samples from irrigation sources or nearby streams, while E. coli was found in equal distributions across all the sample types.

L. monocytogenes and Salmonella were found in higher frequencies in areas with moist soils. For Salmonella , "if you had more precipitation before a sample was collected, you were more likely to find that pathogen," said Strawn. Also, well-drained fields had lower Salmonella prevalence. Knowledge of such factors would help predict whether an area of a farm may be at higher risk.

For Listeria , proximity to water, pastures, livestock and grazing cattle, wildlife habitation and nearby impervious surfaces, roads and ditches all predicted a higher prevalence of the pathogen.

Once such factors have been identified, the GIS platform may be used to filter out specific areas based upon those factors (such as filtering areas that have moist soils and close proximity to water) to create a color-coded map of any farm area with predicted prevalence for a pathogen.

"This work advances our understanding of the environmental microbiology of foodborne pathogens and permits tailored solutions to predict contamination of produce commodities during cultivation," said Peter Bergholz, a research associate in food science and the study's corresponding author.

The research was funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cornell University. The original article was written by Krishna Ramanujan. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. L. K. Strawn, E. D. Fortes, E. A. Bihn, K. K. Nightingale, Y. T. Grohn, R. W. Worobo, M. Wiedmann, P. W. Bergholz. Landscape and Meteorological Factors Affecting Prevalence of Three Foodborne Pathogens in Fruit and Vegetable Farms. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 2012; DOI: 10.1128/AEM.02491-12

Cite This Page:

Cornell University. "Remote sensing, microbiology used to trace foodborne pathogens." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 December 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121205130643.htm>.
Cornell University. (2012, December 5). Remote sensing, microbiology used to trace foodborne pathogens. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121205130643.htm
Cornell University. "Remote sensing, microbiology used to trace foodborne pathogens." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121205130643.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Breakfast Debate: To Eat Or Not To Eat?

Breakfast Debate: To Eat Or Not To Eat?

Newsy (Oct. 23, 2014) Conflicting studies published in the same week re-ignited the debate over whether we should be eating breakfast. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) Fears of Ebola are keeping doctors and patients alike away from hospitals in the West African nation of Guinea. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Despite Rising Death Toll, Many Survive Ebola

Despite Rising Death Toll, Many Survive Ebola

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) The family of a Dallas nurse infected with Ebola in the US says doctors can no longer detect the virus in her. Despite the mounting death toll in West Africa, there are survivors there too. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Working Mother (Oct. 22, 2014) Is your child ready? Video provided by Working Mother
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins