Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

A glimpse inside the control centers of cell communication

Date:
February 14, 2013
Source:
Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI)
Summary:
Researchers have detected characteristic constructional features in a family of sensors that process signals in the human body and control physiological processes.

Schematic diagram of the light receptor rhodopsin, a typical GPCR. The ligand (green) can be seen in the interior. The red struts show the stabilizing contacts between the molecular rods that are characteristic of the construction of the GPCR family. The cell membrane is coloured yellow. The part of the picture at the top is outside the cell and that at the bottom is inside it.
Credit: Paul Scherrer Institute/Xavier Deupi

Researchers have detected characteristic constructional features in a family of sensors that process signals in the human body and control physiological processes.

Related Articles


The cells within the human body continually communicate with one another in order to fulfil their various tasks. For that purpose, they are equipped with sensors with which they receive signals from their environment. Sensors on cell surfaces are known as receptors. Numerous processes taking place within our body -- such as sight, smell or taste -- are performed by an important family of receptors known as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Other receptors that belong to this group are those that control emotions and those that contribute to our reaction to fear and stress. Researchers at the Paul Scherer Institute, together with colleagues from Great Britain, have now analysed the structures of GPCRs and compared them with one another. From this, they have discovered stabilising frameworks of fine struts present in all receptors and therefore characteristic of the architecture of the entire GPCR family. In addition, they have also found a universal connector for docking molecules in the binding pockets of these receptors. Knowledge of this constructional feature, which has been conserved over the course of evolution, can be of significant assistance in the development of new pharmaceuticals.

The scientists have reported on their results in a review article in the scientific journal Nature.

Receptors are complex biomolecules composed of proteins that are embedded in the outer shell of a cell -- the cell membrane. These consist of thousands of atoms and have a defined spatial structure that determines their function. As the effective control centres of cell communication, they recognise stimuli or messenger substances that bind to the cell from outside and change the receptors to transmit the information about the incoming signals into the interior of the cell. The family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) contains about 800 related sensors that perform the most varied tasks within the body: They process light, smell and taste stimuli, transmit the effect of numerous hormones, including adrenaline and histamine, and recognise brain messenger substances such as dopamine and serotonin.

Whenever a messenger substance becomes bound to the GPCR meant for it the biomolecule becomes activated. It changes its shape in such a way that a so-called G protein molecule can dock onto it inside the cell. The binding of the G protein to the receptor initiates a cascade of biochemical events that lead to different responses according to cell type.

Molecular signature of the GPCR family

Over the past 20 years, the determination of the structure of GPCRs has taken great steps forward, so that until now the detailed structures of 17 important receptors in this family have been solved. GPCRs generally consist of a total of seven rod-like molecular components that are joined together and that reach from the outside to the inside of the cell. Within this construct, small electrostatic and hydrophobic forces ensure that contacts are formed between neighbouring molecular rods that hold the nano-machine together.

Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology at Cambridge (UK) have now managed to analyze all known GPCR structures at the atomic level and determine the exact positions of contact for each of the components that form the individual molecular rods. Subsequently, the scientists compared the data they had gathered and were able to identify 24 common contacts that appear in all the receptor structures they had examined, and that always occupy the same key positions in the molecule. "One can imagine these contacts as a framework of fine struts that has been conserved throughout the course of evolution and is characteristic of the architecture of the entire GPCR family," explains Xavier Deupi, structural biologist at the Laboratory for Biomolecular Research at PSI.

The researchers also discovered similarities in the binding pockets of various GPCRs. Here, however, they focused on contacts between receptors and the ligands connected to them, i.e. the signal molecules that dock onto the binding pockets. "The binding pockets of various receptors differ greatly, depending on the size and shape of the ligands. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a type of universal connector deep down on the base of pocket. This connector covered four positions in the protein that together invariably formed four contacts to the ligand -- independent of how the individual ligand is constituted," explains Deupi. Because the universal connector is preserved in all receptors, the scientists believe that this region of the binding pocket plays a decisive role in the activation of GPCRs.

Comparative analysis of protein structures

For their investigations, the researchers developed a method that enabled the information about the spatial structure of proteins to be reduced to the pattern of the contacts within the molecule. In order to be able to compare the patterns obtained, they applied the method of network analysis that bio-information specialists routinely use for studying interactions within biological networks. "This approach enabled us for the first time to objectively observe related receptor structures and filter out similarities. Naturally, contacts emerged that were already known and, in this way, we were able to validate the method. The remaining contacts -- far more than half of them -- we have effectively newly discovered, including contacts between the universal connectors and ligands," says Gebhard Schertler, head of the Biology and Chemistry Department at PSI.

Starting point for developing new medications

GPCRs are involved in quite a number of processes in the body. They act as light sensors in our eyes, make the senses of smell and taste possible, govern how we react to fear and stress and regulate our emotions. This is why the GPCR family is of great interest for pharmaceutical research. "A better understanding of receptor structures and the knowledge of their constructional characteristics will, on the one hand, lead to a better understanding of fundamental vital processes. On the other hand, the results will create a basis for computer-assisted development of new substances. Our results can help, for example, to build better models of GPCRs of those receptors whose spatial structure is still not known," explains Deupi.

About half of all medications available today operate by binding to a GPCR and influencing how it functions. Well-known examples of these are the familiar beta blockers, which control blood pressure, anti-inflammatory substances such as anti-histamines, various psychotropic medications and drugs for treating migraine.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. A. J. Venkatakrishnan, Xavier Deupi, Guillaume Lebon, Christopher G. Tate, Gebhard F. Schertler, M. Madan Babu. Molecular signatures of G-protein-coupled receptors. Nature, 2013; 494 (7436): 185 DOI: 10.1038/nature11896

Cite This Page:

Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). "A glimpse inside the control centers of cell communication." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130214075531.htm>.
Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). (2013, February 14). A glimpse inside the control centers of cell communication. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130214075531.htm
Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). "A glimpse inside the control centers of cell communication." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130214075531.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How A Chorus Led Scientists To A New Frog Species

How A Chorus Led Scientists To A New Frog Species

Newsy (Oct. 30, 2014) A frog noticed by a conservationist on New York's Staten Island has been confirmed as a new species after extensive study and genetic testing. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Surfer Accidentally Stands on Shark, Gets Bitten

Surfer Accidentally Stands on Shark, Gets Bitten

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) A 20-year-old competition surfer said on Thursday he accidentally stepped on a shark's head before it bit him off the Australian east coast. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Endangered Carpathian Ponies Are Making a Comeback in Poland

Endangered Carpathian Ponies Are Making a Comeback in Poland

AFP (Oct. 29, 2014) At the foot of the rugged Carpathian mountains near the Polish-Ukrainian border, ranchers and scientists are trying to protect the Carpathian pony, known as the Hucul in Polish. Duration: 02:17 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tiny, Lab-Grown Stomachs Could Treat Stomach Diseases

Tiny, Lab-Grown Stomachs Could Treat Stomach Diseases

Newsy (Oct. 29, 2014) The researchers grew tiny stomachs using stem cells, saying the research could lead to better treatment for ulcers and even stomach cancer. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins