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Resurrection of 3-billion-year-old antibiotic-resistance proteins

Date:
February 27, 2013
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Scientists are reporting "laboratory resurrections" of several 2-3-billion-year-old proteins that are ancient ancestors of the enzymes that enable today's antibiotic-resistant bacteria to shrug off huge doses of penicillins, cephalosporins and other modern drugs. The achievement opens the door to a scientific "replay" of the evolution of antibiotic resistance with an eye to finding new ways to cope with the problem.

Scientists are reporting "laboratory resurrections" of several 2-3-billion-year-old proteins that are ancient ancestors of the enzymes that enable today's antibiotic-resistant bacteria to shrug off huge doses of penicillins, cephalosporins and other modern drugs. The achievement, reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, opens the door to a scientific "replay" of the evolution of antibiotic resistance with an eye to finding new ways to cope with the problem.

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Jose M. Sanchez-Ruiz, Eric A. Gaucher, Valeria A. Risso and colleagues explain that antibiotic resistance existed long before Alexander Fleming discovered the first antibiotic in 1928. Genes that contain instructions for making the proteins responsible for antibiotic resistance have been found in 30,000-year-old permafrost sediment and other ancient sites. Their research focused on the so-called beta-lactamases, enzymes responsible for resistance to the family of antibiotics that includes penicillin, which scientists believe originated billions of years ago.

They describe using laboratory and statistical techniques to reconstruct the sequences of beta-lactamase proteins dating to Precambrian times, 2-3 billion years ago. The team also synthesized the inferred ancestral enzymes and conducted studies on their stability, structure and function. "The availability of laboratory resurrections of Precambrian beta-lactamases opens up new possibilities in the study of the emergence of antibiotic resistance," the report states. "For instance, it should now be possible to perform laboratory replays of the molecular tape of lactamase evolution and use such replays to probe the molecular determinants of the efficiency of lactamases to adapt to different types of antibiotics." The authors also note that the extreme stability and catalytic features displayed by the 2-3-billion-year-old lactamases suggest that resurrected Precambrian proteins have utility for the biotechnology industry.

The authors and co-authors acknowledge financial support from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, NASA Astrobiology Institute, FEDER Funds and the Georgia Institute of Technology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Valeria A. Risso, Jose A. Gavira, Diego F. Mejia-Carmona, Eric A. Gaucher, Jose M. Sanchez-Ruiz. Hyperstability and Substrate Promiscuity in Laboratory Resurrections of Precambrian β-Lactamases. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2013; 135 (8): 2899 DOI: 10.1021/ja311630a

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Resurrection of 3-billion-year-old antibiotic-resistance proteins." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130227102028.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2013, February 27). Resurrection of 3-billion-year-old antibiotic-resistance proteins. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130227102028.htm
American Chemical Society. "Resurrection of 3-billion-year-old antibiotic-resistance proteins." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130227102028.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

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