Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Mandating fruits and vegetables in school meals makes a difference, study finds

Date:
March 12, 2013
Source:
Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health
Summary:
State laws that require minimum levels of fruits and vegetables in school meals may give a small boost to the amount of these foods in adolescents' diets, according to a new study.

State laws that require minimum levels of fruits and vegetables in school meals may give a small boost to the amount of these foods in adolescents' diets, according to a study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. This effect was strongest in students who had no access to fruits and vegetables at home.

Related Articles


With the recent requirements from the USDA's National School Lunch Program to incorporate healthier options in school meals, the researchers wanted to find out if such laws made a difference in student fruit and vegetable consumption.

At the time the data were collected, the only states in the study that required high schools to provide a minimum number of servings of fruits and vegetables were California and Mississippi, said Daniel Taber, Ph.D., MPH, research scientist with the Institute for Health Research and Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago and lead author on the study.

Students in California and Mississippi who had limited access to fruits and vegetables at home, typically ate unhealthy snacks and who got a school lunch four to five days a week reported an average of 0.45 cups more fruit and 0.61 cups more vegetables than did those who lived in states with no fruit or vegetable requirements in school lunches. Intake was highest in adolescents with access to fruits and vegetables at home.

School nutrition standards have been targeted by policymakers as a way to reduce obesity and disparities in diet, and to get teenagers into the habit of eating fruits and vegetables. Mississippi and other southern states have been aggressive about improving school foods as a means of combating obesity, Taber said. "They are seeing evidence already. Reports in last few months show that childhood obesity is declining in Mississippi."

"The study is excellent but the data does not reflect the new school meal regulations from the U.S. Department of Agriculture than went into effect in July 2012," said Deborah Beauvais, RD, district supervisor of school nutrition for the Gates Chili and East Rochester School Districts in New York and a spokesperson f or Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Newer rules affect all schools participating in the National School Lunch Program and require that a half-cup of fruit or vegetable and up to two cups be in every lunch menu each day, noted Beauvais, adding, "These changes will make the findings from this study more likely." Introducing young people to eating fruits and vegetables regularly in schools helps them want to eat them elsewhere, Beauvais observed. "School cafeterias are becoming recognizable as educational centers."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Daniel R. Taber, Jamie F. Chriqui, Frank J. Chaloupka. State Laws Governing School Meals and Disparities in Fruit/Vegetable Intake. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2013; 44 (4): 365 DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2012.11.038

Cite This Page:

Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health. "Mandating fruits and vegetables in school meals makes a difference, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 March 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130312092225.htm>.
Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health. (2013, March 12). Mandating fruits and vegetables in school meals makes a difference, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130312092225.htm
Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health. "Mandating fruits and vegetables in school meals makes a difference, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130312092225.htm (accessed March 28, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Science & Society News

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Why So Many People Think NASA's Asteroid Mission Is A Waste

Why So Many People Think NASA's Asteroid Mission Is A Waste

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) — The Asteroid Retrieval Mission announced this week bears little resemblance to its grand beginnings. Even NASA scientists are asking, "Why bother?" Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

AP (Mar. 27, 2015) — The White House on Friday announced a five-year plan to fight the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria amid fears that once-treatable germs could become deadly. (March 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Indiana Permits Needle Exchange as HIV Cases Skyrocket

Indiana Permits Needle Exchange as HIV Cases Skyrocket

Reuters - US Online Video (Mar. 26, 2015) — Governor Mike Pence declares the recent HIV outbreak in rural Indiana a "public health emergency" and authorizes a short-term needle-exchange program. Rough Cut (no reporter narration) Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
AAA: Distracted Driving a Serious Teen Problem

AAA: Distracted Driving a Serious Teen Problem

AP (Mar. 25, 2015) — While distracted driving is not a new problem for teens, new research from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety says it&apos;s much more serious than previously thought. (March 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Science & Society

Business & Industry

Education & Learning

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins