Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Anatomist is fleshing out dinosaur heads, reaching people about science

Date:
April 22, 2013
Source:
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Summary:
Accurately depicting dinosaur anatomy has come a long way since the science fiction films of the 1960s.

Accurately depicting dinosaur anatomy has come a long way since the science fiction films of the 1960s. In celebration of the American Association of Anatomists' (AAA) 125th anniversary, renowned dinosaur anatomy expert Dr. Lawrence Witmer will deliver a lecture reflecting on the AAA's first President Joseph Leidy, also a preeminent American dinosaur paleontologist, and the modernizing of prehistoric bones.

Related Articles


Witmer will show how the Visible Interactive Dinosaur (VID) project recreates soft-tissue systems within a 3D digital environment. VID, funded by the National Science Foundation, is a global project that aims to digitally put back all of the tissues that time has stripped away to create the most realistic renderings of dinosaurs science has seen.

"Nature has left us bones," said Witmer. "We need to flesh them out, put back muscles, nerves, sinuses, and animate the skeleton. VID does that. We look at animals today, starting with dinosaur descendants -- birds and crocodiles -- and we study them to have an understanding of how the dinosaur jaw worked, and what their brain structure was," he added.

"Hollywood has been bringing dinosaurs to life for years, but as scientists we can do it in a controlled way to see how these anatomical systems actually work," said Witmer. "Dinosaurs present interesting problems; the solutions help explain scientific issues in physiology and anatomy, such as how does a 50-ton animal move around? How did they pump blood to a head 30 ft away?" The answers inform today's anatomy questions.

Dr. Witmer sees the work of VID as having a dual purpose -- helping other paleontologists and educating, even inspiring, the public about physiology and anatomy.

"The study of dinosaurs is important because it allows us to reach people about science. The fact is, dinosaurs are popular but science is still considered 'hard' by many people. So one of the missions of VID is to use dinosaurs as a tool to excite people about anatomy and science. We lure them with dinosaurs and sneak in cool science," he said. The result is a win for both scientific advancement and science advocacy.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Anatomist is fleshing out dinosaur heads, reaching people about science." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130422111230.htm>.
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. (2013, April 22). Anatomist is fleshing out dinosaur heads, reaching people about science. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130422111230.htm
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Anatomist is fleshing out dinosaur heads, reaching people about science." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130422111230.htm (accessed January 31, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Fossils & Ruins News

Saturday, January 31, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Discovery Of 'Dragon' Dinosaur In China Could Explain Myths

Discovery Of 'Dragon' Dinosaur In China Could Explain Myths

Newsy (Jan. 30, 2015) A long-necked dinosaur from the Jurassic Period was discovered in China. Researchers think it could answer mythology questions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Battle of Waterloo Artefacts Go on Display at Windsor Castle

Battle of Waterloo Artefacts Go on Display at Windsor Castle

AFP (Jan. 29, 2015) Artefacts from the Battle of Waterloo go on display at Windsor Castle to mark the 200th anniversary of the momentous battle. The exhibition includes contemporary prints, drawings and personal belongings of French Emperor Napoleon. Duration: 00:31 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mideast Skull Find Sheds Light on Human Ancestors' Trek

Mideast Skull Find Sheds Light on Human Ancestors' Trek

AFP (Jan. 29, 2015) A 55,000-year-old partial skull found in the Middle East gives clues to when our ancestors left their African homeland, and strengthens theories that they co-habited with Neanderthals. Duration: 00:54 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Say Earliest Snakes Lived Alongside The Dinosaurs

Scientists Say Earliest Snakes Lived Alongside The Dinosaurs

Newsy (Jan. 28, 2015) Wrongly categorized as lizard fossils, snake fossils now show the reptile could have developed earlier than we thought — 70 million years earlier. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins