Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Model of dangerous bee disease in Jersey provides tool in fight against honeybee infections

Date:
September 16, 2013
Source:
University of Warwick
Summary:
Scientists have modelled an outbreak of the bee infection American foulbrood in Jersey, using a technique which could be applied to other honeybee diseases such as European foulbrood and the Varroa parasite.

American foulbrood is caused by the bacterium Paenibacillus larvae, which affects the larval stage of honeybees. It can cause the death of an entire hive within a matter of months.
Credit: The University of Warwick

Scientists at the University of Warwick have modelled an outbreak of the bee infection American foulbrood in Jersey, using a technique which could be applied to other honeybee diseases such as European foulbrood and the Varroa parasite.

As well as modelling how bee infections spread, the method also allows scientists to simulate various disease control interventions in order to measure their efficacy.

The researchers used two sets of data gathered two months apart during an outbreak of American foulbrood in Jersey in the summer of 2010. This provided two 'snapshots' of the disease from which they attempted to reconstruct the entire epidemic.

Reconstructions like this are common for livestock infections, but this is the first time the method has been applied to bee disease.

The research is published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface.

American foulbrood is caused by the bacterium Paenibacillus larvae, which affects the larval stage of honeybees. It can cause the death of an entire hive within a matter of months

The Jersey data covered 450 honeybee hives, their location and their owners, from which the researchers built a computer simulation which modelled the speed at which the infection grew as well as how it spread geographically.

Dr Samik Datta of the WIDER group, based at the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick, said: "Honeybees are one of the most important bee species in the world in terms of their contribution to food production through pollination.

"But in the past 20 years there has been a marked increase in the level of disease among bee populations.

"American foulbrood is an unusually virulent disease which can wipe out a hive within a few months.

"By understanding how it is spreads from hive to hive, we then have a good basis to formulate interventions.

"This is the first rigorous statistical analysis carried out on a honeybee disease epidemic that we are aware of."

The model suggests that just under half of the 2010 Jersey infection spread was attributed to transmission by owners between their own hives.

The researchers suggest that distance between colonies was another important factor in the spread of the disease, with the disease mostly spreading between hives less than 2km apart.

The model also simulated the impact of different control strategies on controlling the epidemic and found that the measures taken by authorities in Jersey at the time -- to inspect and destroy infected colonies -- were the most effective.

However their model suggested an earlier intervention would have made disease extinction more likely.

The researchers hope now to expand their model to investigate the spread of European Foulbrood, a more common bee disease in the UK. They also believe the same technique can be applied to the Varroa parasite.

Dr Datta said: "Using just two snapshots of data we have been able to reconstruct this epidemic, and we are confident that our technique can be applied to a wide range of other outbreak scenarios."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Warwick. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. S. Datta, J. C. Bull, G. E. Budge, M. J. Keeling. Modelling the spread of American foulbrood in honeybees. Journal of The Royal Society Interface, 2013; 10 (88): 20130650 DOI: 10.1098/%u200Brsif.2013.0650

Cite This Page:

University of Warwick. "Model of dangerous bee disease in Jersey provides tool in fight against honeybee infections." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 September 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130916091140.htm>.
University of Warwick. (2013, September 16). Model of dangerous bee disease in Jersey provides tool in fight against honeybee infections. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130916091140.htm
University of Warwick. "Model of dangerous bee disease in Jersey provides tool in fight against honeybee infections." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130916091140.htm (accessed August 22, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Friday, August 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) — An experimental drug used to treat Marburg virus in rhesus monkeys could give new insight into a similar treatment for Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Terrifying City-Dwelling Spiders Are Bigger And More Fertile

Terrifying City-Dwelling Spiders Are Bigger And More Fertile

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) — According to a new study, spiders that live in cities are bigger, fatter and multiply faster. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) — According to a new study, elderly people might have trouble sleeping because of the loss of a certain group of neurons in the brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ramen Health Risks: The Dark Side of the Noodle

Ramen Health Risks: The Dark Side of the Noodle

AP (Aug. 21, 2014) — South Koreans eat more instant ramen noodles per capita than anywhere else in the world. But American researchers say eating too much may increase the risk of diabetes, heart disease and stroke. (Aug. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins