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The benefits of bacteria for gut health

Date:
October 18, 2013
Source:
EMBO - excellence in life sciences
Summary:
Scientists have shown that specific gut bacteria are beneficial for maintaining a healthy intestine in the fruit fly Drosophila and mice and also contribute to the overall health of these organisms. The researchers demonstrated that bacteria in the gut, particularly members of the genus Lactobacillus, promote the growth of host epithelial cells and that this is essential for maintaining homeostasis in the intestinal system.

Scientists from the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, United States have shown that specific gut bacteria are beneficial for maintaining a healthy intestine in the fruit fly Drosophila and mice and also contribute to the overall health of these organisms. The researchers demonstrated that bacteria in the gut, particularly members of the genus Lactobacillus, promote the growth of host epithelial cells and that this is essential for maintaining homeostasis in the intestinal system.

The findings, which are published today in The EMBO Journal, could have implications for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease as well as allergic, metabolic and infectious disorders.

"It is well-known that mammals live in a homeostatic symbiosis with their gut microbiota and that they influence a wide range of physiological processes. However, the molecular mechanisms of the symbiotic cross-talk in the gut are largely unrecognized," stated Andrew S. Neish, Professor at the Emory University School of Medicine, who led the research. "In our study, we have discovered that Lactobacilli can stimulate reactive oxygen species that have regulatory effects on intestinal stem cells, including the activation of proliferation of these cells."

Using two different animal models, the researchers showed that the highly conserved underlying mechanism of this symbiotic relationship is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), by a class of conserved enzymes called NADPH oxidases or Nox'es. When animal guts were colonized by Lactobacillus, ROS production caused cell growth in intestinal stem cells. In contrast, in germ-free animals ROS production was absent and resulted in suppressed growth of epithelial cells. Lead author Rheinallt M. Jones, commented: "Our data support the concept of commensal bacterial-induced generation of ROS as a transducer of bacterial signals into host cell signaling, thus establishing a mechanism for host/bacterial cross-talk."

In addition, the study suggests that specific redox-mediated functions may contribute to the identification of further microbes with probiotic potential. The researchers also suggest that the primordial ancestral response to bacteria may well be the generation of ROS for signaling and microbicidal activities.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by EMBO - excellence in life sciences. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Sabrina Büttner, Lukas Habernig, Filomena Broeskamp, Doris Ruli, F Nora Vögtle, Manolis Vlachos, Francesca Macchi, Victoria Küttner, Didac Carmona-Gutierrez, Tobias Eisenberg, Julia Ring, Maria Markaki, Asli Aras Taskin, Stefan Benke, Christoph Ruckenstuhl, Ralf Braun, Chris Van den Haute, Tine Bammens, Anke van der Perren, Kai-Uwe Fröhlich, Joris Winderickx, Guido Kroemer, Veerle Baekelandt, Nektarios Tavernarakis, Gabor G Kovacs, Jörn Dengjel, Chris Meisinger, Stephan J Sigrist, Frank Madeo. Endonuclease G mediates α-synuclein cytotoxicity during Parkinson’s disease. The EMBO Journal, 2013; DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2013.228

Cite This Page:

EMBO - excellence in life sciences. "The benefits of bacteria for gut health." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131018132058.htm>.
EMBO - excellence in life sciences. (2013, October 18). The benefits of bacteria for gut health. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131018132058.htm
EMBO - excellence in life sciences. "The benefits of bacteria for gut health." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131018132058.htm (accessed April 19, 2014).

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