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Researchers delve into the behavior of cohesins

Date:
October 18, 2013
Source:
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)
Summary:
Understanding the regulation of cohesins can improve diagnosis and treatment for some cancer patients or those suffering from Cornella de Lange Syndrome. New research shows that Pds5 proteins modulate the behavior of cohesins to ensure the proper division of cells.

Cells lacking Pds5B divide their genetic material in a defective manner (right), compared to normal cells (left).
Credit: CNIO

Understanding the regulation of cohesins can improve diagnosis and treatment for some cancer patients or those suffering from Cornella de Lange Syndrome. New research shows that Pds5 proteins modulate the behavior of cohesins to ensure the proper division of cells.

Cohesins are protein complexes that join the two copies of each chromosome -- called sister chromatids -- to ensure that they are shared fairly between the daughter cells during cell division. In this way, each daughter cell receives exactly the same genetic information from the parent cell.

Pds5 is a protein associated with cohesins; it binds cohesins along different chromosome regions. In vertebrates there are two variants of Pds5, Pds5A and Pds5B, not very well characterised to date. Scientists from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), led by Ana Losada, from the Chromosome Dynamics Group, have discovered -- by using genetically-modified mice (knock-out mice for Pds5A and Pds5B) -- that the two Pds5 variants are not equivalent, as both are necessary for cell proliferation and for embryo development to take place correctly.

The results, published today in the online version of The EMBO Journal, contribute to improving our understanding of how Pds5 proteins modulate the behaviour of cohesins, either by stabilising or destabilising the binding of cohesins to the chromosomes.

Clinical Implications

Illnesses such as Cornella de Lange Syndrome, which affects 1/30,000 newborns and which is characterised by serious physical abnormalities and cognitive impairments, have their origin in the abnormal function of cohesins. Cohesin mutations have recently been identified in some types of tumours, such as bladder cancer or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). "If we understand the function and regulation of the cohesins, we can improve the diagnosis and treatment for affected patients," says Losada.

"In this context, we have seen that both forms of Pds5 stabilise the binding of cohesins to the arms and distal regions of chromosomes, whilst only Pds5B does so in the centromeres -- the chromosomal regions that are most critical for chromosome separation during cell division," explains Losada.

But Pds5 proteins not only stabilise cohesins, they can also have the opposite effect when they bind to the Wapl protein. "In this case, Pds5 contributes to destabilising the binding of cohesins to chromosomes, which can sometimes be important for activating essential genes at the right moment, as well as for allowing an efficient separation of the sister chromatids during cell division."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Marνa Carretero, Miguel Ruiz-Torres, Miriam Rodrνguez-Corsino, Isabel Barthelemy, Ana Losada. Pds5B is required for cohesion establishment and Aurora B accumulation at centromeres. The EMBO Journal, 2013; DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2013.230

Cite This Page:

Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO). "Researchers delve into the behavior of cohesins." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131018132248.htm>.
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO). (2013, October 18). Researchers delve into the behavior of cohesins. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131018132248.htm
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO). "Researchers delve into the behavior of cohesins." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131018132248.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

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