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New heart valve repair option provides hope for high-risk patients

Date:
November 13, 2013
Source:
University of Virginia Health System
Summary:
A minimally invasive procedure is the first effective treatment for patients who are high risk for standard open heart surgery for a leaking heart valve, a study has found.

A minimally invasive procedure is the first effective treatment for patients who are high risk for standard open heart surgery for a leaking heart valve, a study led by a University of Virginia School of Medicine researcher has found.

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The new procedure repairs the mitral valve, which regulates blood flow between chambers of the heart. Degenerative mitral valves cause severe mitral regurgitation, which occurs when blood flows backward into the heart. Left untreated, severe mitral regurgitation can lead to heart failure and death.

The device used to repair the mitral valve, Abbott's MitraClip® device, was recently approved for use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. UVA Health System is among the first hospitals in the country to offer this procedure for select high-risk patients with severe degenerative mitral regurgitation. The UVA Heart Valve team trains physicians from around the world to perform this procedure.

"Patients whose health would not allow them to undergo surgery haven't previously had a treatment option for their mitral regurgitation," said UVA interventional cardiologist Scott Lim, MD, who led the study. "This study demonstrated that the MitraClip is a viable treatment for this life-threatening condition."

Minimally Invasive Treatment

Published by Lim and colleagues in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, the study examined outcomes for high-risk patients with severe degenerative mitral regurgitation. The patients were high risk for open heart surgery to replace their mitral valve due to one or more risk factors, such as frailty or additional severe medical conditions.

The study examined the safety and effectiveness of the MitraClip, inserted through a catheter that reaches the patient's heart through a small leg incision. One or two MitraClips are then placed on the leaking portions of the mitral valve.

Benefits to Patients' Health

More than 95 percent of patients in the study had a MitraClip successfully inserted, and patients saw health improvements in several areas, including:

• Improvement in their mitral regurgitation

• Reduction in hospitalizations for heart failure

• Improvement in heart function

• Improvement in their quality of life as measured by surveys before and after the procedure

"The study found that the MitraClip procedure is safe and provides significantly improved outcomes for patients with severe degenerative mitral regurgitation who are at prohibitive risk for surgery," Lim said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Virginia Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. D. Scott Lim, Matthew R. Reynolds, Ted Feldman, Saibal Kar, Howard C. Herrmann, Andrew Wang, Patrick L. Whitlow, William A. Gray, Paul Grayburn, Michael J. Mack, Donald Glower. Improved Functional Status and Quality of Life in Prohibitive Surgical Risk Patients With Degenerative Mitral Regurgitation Following Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair with the MitraClip® System. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 2013; DOI: 10.1016/j.jacc.2013.10.021

Cite This Page:

University of Virginia Health System. "New heart valve repair option provides hope for high-risk patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131113102048.htm>.
University of Virginia Health System. (2013, November 13). New heart valve repair option provides hope for high-risk patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131113102048.htm
University of Virginia Health System. "New heart valve repair option provides hope for high-risk patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131113102048.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

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