Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Infection with common cold virus: scientists reveal new insights

Date:
December 30, 2013
Source:
Medical University of Vienna
Summary:
On average, each of us catches a cold two to three times a year. However, how the common cold virus actually infects us is only partly understood. Researchers have now provided new insights into this process.

On average, each of us catches a cold two to three times a year. However, how the common cold virus actually infects us is only partly understood. Researchers from the Max F. Perutz Laboratories of the Medical University of Vienna and the University of Vienna, in collaboration with two Spanish groups, have now provided new insights into this process.

The common cold virus (rhinovirus) is a tiny, almost round particle, containing the tightly packed genetic material surrounded by a protein shell (the virus capsid). Details on how the RNA is prepped to exit the capsid and effectively infect us have now been provided by scientists from the Max F. Perutz Laboratories in collaboration with groups at the Universities of Barcelona and Madrid. The study has been published in the journal PNAS.

The researchers investigated how the structure of one of the common cold virus types changes upon infection with the host cell, leading to the release of the RNA and its duplication. Dieter Blaas from the Max F. Perutz Laboratories says: "Interestingly we found that the conformation of the RNA, and in turn its interaction with the inner side of the virus capsid changes. This seems to be crucial to 'avoid knots' when the long thread-like RNA molecule is unfolded in order to exit the capsid."

The studies' findings are also relevant for viruses causing poliomyelitis and hepatitis A amongst many others As rhinoviruses belong to the family of picornaviruses, the findings of the study are also relevant for other viral diseases, for example polio or hepatitis A, and could give cues for new types of therapy.

However, many questions regarding infections with the common cold virus remain unclear. That's why the researchers at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories, led by Dieter Blaas, will now investigate another step of the infection process: They want to know how the RNA "knows" which one of the 30 pores that open in the virus capsid has become positioned on top of a cellular membrane. This is crucial, as the virus RNA has to first penetrate such a membrane to get to the cytoplasm of the host cell, where it can then replicate and produce more virus particles.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Medical University of Vienna. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. A. Pickl-Herk, D. Luque, L. Vives-Adrian, J. Querol-Audi, D. Garriga, B. L. Trus, N. Verdaguer, D. Blaas, J. R. Caston. Uncoating of common cold virus is preceded by RNA switching as determined by X-ray and cryo-EM analyses of the subviral A-particle. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2013; 110 (50): 20063 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1312128110

Cite This Page:

Medical University of Vienna. "Infection with common cold virus: scientists reveal new insights." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 December 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131230101432.htm>.
Medical University of Vienna. (2013, December 30). Infection with common cold virus: scientists reveal new insights. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131230101432.htm
Medical University of Vienna. "Infection with common cold virus: scientists reveal new insights." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131230101432.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued new protocols for healthcare workers interacting with Ebola patients. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) A medical team has for the first time given a man the ability to walk again after transplanting cells from his brain onto his severed spinal cord. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 21, 2014) The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has set up new guidelines for health workers taking care of patients infected with Ebola. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Cadaver Dog' Sniffs out Human Remains

'Cadaver Dog' Sniffs out Human Remains

AP (Oct. 21, 2014) Where's a body buried? Buster's nose can often tell you. He's a cadaver dog, specially trained to find human remains and increasingly being used by law enforcement and accepted in courts. These dogs are helping solve even decades-old mysteries. (Oct. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins