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Constructed wetlands save frogs, birds threatened with extinction

Date:
January 21, 2014
Source:
Expertsvar
Summary:
Over the last few decades, several thousands of wetlands have been constructed in Sweden in agricultural landscapes. The primary reason is that the wetlands prevent a surfeit of nutrients from reaching our oceans and lakes. A study shows, in addition, that wetlands have contributed to saving several frog and bird species from the “Red List” -– a list that shows which species are at risk of dying out in Sweden.

Over the last few decades, several thousands of wetlands have been constructed in Sweden in agricultural landscapes. The primary reason is that the wetlands prevent a surfeit of nutrients from reaching our oceans and lakes. A study from Halmstad University shows, in addition, that wetlands have contributed to saving several frog and bird species from the "Red List" -- a list that shows which species are at risk of dying out in Sweden. In the latest update, five of the nine red-listed bird species that breed in wetlands-including the little grebe and the little ringed plover-could be taken off the list. Yet another bird species was moved to a lower threat category. As regards batrachians, four species-among them the European tree frog-have been taken off the list, and two species have been moved to a lower threat category.

Great effect on biological diversity

"An important objective in constructing wetlands is reducing eutrophication -- over-fertilization. It's surprisingly positive that they've also had such a great direct effect on biological diversity," says Stefan Weisner, Professor of Biology specialising in environmental science at Halmstad University.

During the 19th and 20th centuries, the amount of wetlands in Sweden decreased drastically: almost all original wetlands in agricultural areas have disappeared through drainage and land reclamation. This has affected many of the plants and animals that depend on these types of environments.

An inexpensive way to reduce eutrophication

Over the last 15 years, nearly 3,000 wetland areas have been constructed in agricultural landscapes around Sweden. Farmers have the possibility of receiving economic support for this from sources such as the Swedish Board of Agriculture. The primary reason is because wetlands catch the surfeit of nutrients from agriculture such as nitrogen and phosphorus-substances that would otherwise have leaked out into the seas and lakes and contributed to eutrophication.

The study shows that creation of wetlands is a cost-effective to catch the nutrients.

"It's a very effective way of purifying the water. It's less expensive than constructing treatment plants, and in addition it contributes to biological diversity," Prof Weisner says.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Expertsvar. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. John A. Strand, Stefan E.B. Weisner. Effects of wetland construction on nitrogen transport and species richness in the agricultural landscape—Experiences from Sweden. Ecological Engineering, 2013; 56: 14 DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoleng.2012.12.087

Cite This Page:

Expertsvar. "Constructed wetlands save frogs, birds threatened with extinction." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140121092911.htm>.
Expertsvar. (2014, January 21). Constructed wetlands save frogs, birds threatened with extinction. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140121092911.htm
Expertsvar. "Constructed wetlands save frogs, birds threatened with extinction." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140121092911.htm (accessed September 20, 2014).

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