Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Will your child be a slim adult? Crowdsourcing novel childhood predictors of adult obesity

Date:
February 5, 2014
Source:
Cornell Food & Brand Lab
Summary:
This novel study asked 532 international English speaking adults to submit or crowd-source predictors of whether a child is going to be an overweight or a slim adult. The results indicate that crowd-sourced information could be used to identify new predictors that may, after further study, be useful in understanding and reducing obesity. Furthermore, the trends in BMI obtained through this study provide insights into behaviors that should be encouraged to help children maintain a healthy BMI into adulthood.

This is an infographic outlining some of the indicators uncovered in this study.
Credit: Daniel Miller

Will your child be a slim adult? A novel new study published in PLOS ONE asked 532 international English speaking adults to submit or "crowd-source" predictors of whether a child is going to be an overweight or a slim adult. Each participant offered what they believed to be the best predictor of what a child would weigh as an adult and submitted it in the form of a question. Questions were related to factors of participants' childhood experience including home environment, psychosocial well-being, lifestyle, built environment, and family history. Each participant also supplied his or her height and weight (to determine BMI) and answered questions generated by other participants about their own childhood behaviors and conditions. Several of the questions asked had a significant correlation with participants' current BMI as listed below.

Related Articles


Adults who reported a lower BMI also reported having the following childhood experiences in common:

  • Their families prepared meals using fresh ingredients.
  • Their parents talked with them about nutrition.
  • They frequently engaged in outdoor physical activity with their families.
  • They slept a healthy number of hours on weeknights.
  • They had many friends.

Adults who reported a higher BMI, also reported having the following childhood experiences in common:

  • Food was used as a reward or punishment at home.
  • They had obese parents and/or grandparents.
  • They drank juice and soda more than water.
  • Their parents restricted their food intake.
  • They were bullied by peers.

While some of the factors listed above have been researched previously in relation to BMI, others have not been studied much or at all. These results indicate that "crowd-sourced," or publicly-generated, information could be used to identify new predictors that may, after further study, be useful in understanding and reducing obesity.

Furthermore, the trends in BMI obtained through this study provide insights into behaviors that should be encouraged to help children maintain a healthy BMI into adulthood! Parents should make note of these predictors and create a nurturing and healthy home environment and lifestyle for their children that includes: meals made from scratch, healthy eating conversations, plenty of sleep, outdoor exercise, and supporting healthy friendships with peers.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cornell Food & Brand Lab. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kirsten E. Bevelander, Kirsikka Kaipainen, Robert Swain, Simone Dohle, Josh C. Bongard, Paul D. H. Hines, Brian Wansink. Crowdsourcing Novel Childhood Predictors of Adult Obesity. PLoS ONE, 2014; 9 (2): e87756 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0087756

Cite This Page:

Cornell Food & Brand Lab. "Will your child be a slim adult? Crowdsourcing novel childhood predictors of adult obesity." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140205184740.htm>.
Cornell Food & Brand Lab. (2014, February 5). Will your child be a slim adult? Crowdsourcing novel childhood predictors of adult obesity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140205184740.htm
Cornell Food & Brand Lab. "Will your child be a slim adult? Crowdsourcing novel childhood predictors of adult obesity." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140205184740.htm (accessed April 18, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Our Love Of Puppy Dog Eyes Explained By Science

Our Love Of Puppy Dog Eyes Explained By Science

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2015) Researchers found a spike in oxytocin occurs in both humans and dogs when they gaze into each other&apos;s eyes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find Link Between Gestational Diabetes And Autism

Scientists Find Link Between Gestational Diabetes And Autism

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2015) Researchers who analyzed data from over 300,000 kids and their mothers say they&apos;ve found a link between gestational diabetes and autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Video Messages Help Reassure Dementia Patients

Video Messages Help Reassure Dementia Patients

AP (Apr. 17, 2015) Family members are prerecording messages as part of a unique pilot program at the Hebrew Home in New York. The videos are trying to help victims of Alzheimer&apos;s disease and other forms of dementia break through the morning fog of forgetfulness. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Boy or Girl? Intersex Awareness Is on the Rise

Boy or Girl? Intersex Awareness Is on the Rise

AP (Apr. 17, 2015) At least 1 in 5,000 U.S. babies are born each year with intersex conditions _ ambiguous genitals because of genetic glitches or hormone problems. Secrecy and surgery are common. But some doctors and activists are trying to change things. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins