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Organic agriculture can pollute groundwater, research shows

Date:
February 18, 2014
Source:
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Summary:
Public demand has led to the rapid development of organic farming in recent years to provide healthy food products that are free of chemical additives and to reduce industrial and groundwater pollution worldwide. However, according to a new paper, intensive organic matter using composted manure prior to planting resulted in significantly higher groundwater pollution rates compared with liquid fertilization techniques. The study compared the water quality across the entire unsaturated zone under organic and conventional greenhouses in Israel.

Researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU), using specialized monitoring technology, have determined that intensive organic agriculture can cause significant pollution from nitrate leaching into groundwater.

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Public demand has led to the rapid development of organic farming in recent years to provide healthy food products that are free of chemical additives and to reduce industrial and groundwater pollution worldwide.

But, according to the paper published in the Hydrology and Earth System Sciences journal, intensive organic matter using composted manure prior to planting resulted in significantly higher groundwater pollution rates compared with liquid fertilization techniques through drip irrigation.

The study used Vadose Zone Monitoring System technology developed at BGU and commercialized by Sensoil Innovations Ltd. to compare the water quality across the entire unsaturated zone under organic and conventional greenhouses in Israel.

The system is designed to monitor liquid, gas and soil hydraulic properties and allows real time continuous tracking of water in deep sections of the vadose zone, from land surface to groundwater. It is currently being used in more than 25 commercial and research sites in the United States, Israel, Spain, Namibia, and South Africa.

While groundwater pollution is usually attributed to a large array of chemicals, high nitrate concentration in aquifer water is the main cause for drinking-water well shutdowns.

The down leaching of nitrates under intensive organic farming is due to nutrient release from the compost to the soil during the early stages of the growing season. In this stage, nutrient uptake capacity of the young plants is very low and down leaching of nitrates to the deeper parts of the vadose zone and groundwater is unavoidable.

The study, funded by the Israel Water Authority, was conducted in commercial greenhouses on the Southern part of the coastal aquifer in Israel.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. O. Dahan, A. Babad, N. Lazarovitch, E. E. Russak, D. Kurtzman. Nitrate leaching from intensive organic farms to groundwater. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions, 2013; 10 (7): 9915 DOI: 10.5194/hessd-10-9915-2013

Cite This Page:

American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. "Organic agriculture can pollute groundwater, research shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140218114311.htm>.
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. (2014, February 18). Organic agriculture can pollute groundwater, research shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140218114311.htm
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. "Organic agriculture can pollute groundwater, research shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140218114311.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

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