Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Study suggests non-uniform climate warming globally

Date:
March 5, 2014
Source:
University of Oklahoma
Summary:
A recent study of five decades of satellite data, model simulations and in situ observations suggests the impact of seasonal diurnal or daily warming varies between global regions affecting many ecosystem functions and services, such as food production, carbon sequestration and climate regulation. The effects of non-uniform climate warming on terrestrial ecosystems is a key challenge in carbon cycle research and for those making future predictions.

A recent University of Oklahoma study of five decades of satellite data, model simulations and in situ observations suggests the impact of seasonal diurnal or daily warming varies between global regions affecting many ecosystem functions and services, such as food production, carbon sequestration and climate regulation. The effects of non-uniform climate warming on terrestrial ecosystems is a key challenge in carbon cycle research and for those making future predictions.

Related Articles


Jianyang Xia, a research associate in the OU College of Arts and Sciences, says the impact of non-uniform warming is just one aspect of climate change. Shifts in precipitation and disturbances, such as wildfires, increases in the frequency of extreme temperature events, large year-to-year shifts in temperature and shifts in regional climate zones can be expected as the climate warms. A complete understanding of the consequences of climate change for carbon cycling on land requires insight into the impact of all these changes on the ecosystem.

As this study suggests, the rate of climate warming varies by season and region, and between day and night. A synthesis of air temperature data from across the world reveals a greater rate of warming in winter than in summer in northern and high latitudes, but the inverse is true in some tropical regions.

Also, the data show a decline in the daily temperature range over 51 percent of the globe and an increase over only 13 percent, because night-time temperatures in most locations have risen faster than daytime temperatures.

From the data analyzed, a number of trends emerged in non-uniform climate warming for ecosystem carbon cycling. Spring warming will enhance ecosystem carbon uptake at high latitudes and diminish the magnitude of seasonal temperature change in these regions. Summer and autumn warming are more likely to reduce ecosystem carbon uptake in tropical ecosystems and amplify the magnitude of seasonal temperature change.

The contrasting impacts of day- and night-time warming on plant carbon gain and loss are apparent in many regions. Day warming increases carbon uptake in most areas of tundra and boreal forests but decreases it in most grasslands and deserts. Night warming enhances carbon uptake in arid ecosystems, such as grassland desert but has negative impacts in other regions.

Most of the existing temperature-manipulation experiments relied on continuous and uniform warming, so further research is needed to predict the effects of non-uniform climate warming on terrestrial carbon cycling. A paper on this study was accepted for early online publication on February 23, 2014, by Nature Geoscience.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Oklahoma. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jianyang Xia, Jiquan Chen, Shilong Piao, Philippe Ciais, Yiqi Luo, Shiqiang Wan. Terrestrial carbon cycle affected by non-uniform climate warming. Nature Geoscience, 2014; 7 (3): 173 DOI: 10.1038/ngeo2093

Cite This Page:

University of Oklahoma. "Study suggests non-uniform climate warming globally." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140305160759.htm>.
University of Oklahoma. (2014, March 5). Study suggests non-uniform climate warming globally. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140305160759.htm
University of Oklahoma. "Study suggests non-uniform climate warming globally." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140305160759.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Earth & Climate News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Bolivian Recycling Initiative Turns Plastic Waste Into School Furniture

Bolivian Recycling Initiative Turns Plastic Waste Into School Furniture

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Innovative recycling project in La Paz separates city waste and converts plastic garbage into school furniture made from 'plastiwood'. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Blu-Ray Discs Getting Second Run As Solar Panels

Blu-Ray Discs Getting Second Run As Solar Panels

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers at Northwestern University are repurposing Blu-ray movies for better solar panel technology thanks to the discs' internal structures. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Antarctic Sea Ice Mystery Thickens... Literally

Antarctic Sea Ice Mystery Thickens... Literally

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — Antarctic sea ice isn't only expanding, it's thicker than previously thought, and scientists aren't sure exactly why. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
3D Map of Antarctic Sea Ice to Shed Light on Climate Change

3D Map of Antarctic Sea Ice to Shed Light on Climate Change

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 24, 2014) — A multinational group of scientists have released the first ever detailed, high-resolution 3-D maps of Antarctic sea ice. Using an underwater robot equipped with sonar, the researchers mapped the underside of a massive area of sea ice to gauge the impact of climate change. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins