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New insight into improved wave energy testing

Date:
March 24, 2014
Source:
University of Exeter
Summary:
Pioneering research could provide a significant boost in the vital quest to harness wave power as a viable renewable energy source for the future. Researchers deployed wave measurement buoys and used wave modelling to show how variations in wave size and strength could be resolved.

Pioneering research could provide a significant boost in the vital quest to harness wave power as a viable renewable energy source for the future. Scientists from the University of Exeter have studied how wave energy developers can more accurately measure, and predict the wave conditions within wave energy test sites.

The research, which is published in scientific journal Energy, deployed wave measurement buoys and used wave modelling to show how variations in wave size and strength could be resolved.

The results should aid developers to better predict sea conditions within wave energy test sites, which is the crucial factor governing how much energy can be produced.

This latest study is part of ongoing research by the University and key partners into waves as a renewable energy source. With ongoing support from the Regional Growth Fund, these methods are now being applied to the Wave Hub and FabTest energy test sites in Cornwall, to support industrial partners testing at these sites.

The research has been co-authored by Dr Ian Ashton and Dr Lars Johanning, both from the Renewable Energy department based at the University of Exeter's Penryn Campus in Cornwall and was supported by the National Environmental Research Council (NERC) Flowbec project.

Dr Ashton said: "This research forms part of our work to support developers get the most out of the world class marine energy test facilities and measurement infrastructure that we have in Cornwall, and it is great to be able to support the development of this industry'.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Exeter. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. I. Ashton, J.C.C. Van-Nieuwkoop-McCall, H.C.M. Smith, L. Johanning. Spatial variability of waves within a marine energy site using in-situ measurements and a high resolution spectral wave model. Energy, 2014; 66: 699 DOI: 10.1016/j.energy.2013.12.065

Cite This Page:

University of Exeter. "New insight into improved wave energy testing." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140324111556.htm>.
University of Exeter. (2014, March 24). New insight into improved wave energy testing. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140324111556.htm
University of Exeter. "New insight into improved wave energy testing." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140324111556.htm (accessed September 22, 2014).

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