Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Tastier low-fat products: Bacteria may improve low-fat products, help dairy producers

Date:
May 27, 2014
Source:
South Dakota State University
Summary:
Consumers may have more palatable low-fat products and milk producers a solution to an industry-wide problem through use of a unique strain of lactic acid bacteria, according researchers. Low-fat products tend to have inferior texture and flavor because removing fat makes their structure rubbery. After examining bacteria from the dairy environment for more than 15 years, the researchers found a strain that mimics fat.

SDSU dairy science associate professor Ashraf Hassan and doctoral student Nuria Garcia are refining an enzyme extracted from a unique bacterial strain that removes buildup in dairy equipment called biofilm. Garcia received a national award from the American Dairy Science Association in 2013 for a poster describing her work on biofilms.
Credit: Eric Landwehr

Consumers may have more palatable low-fat products and milk producers a solution to an industry-wide problem through use of a unique strain of lactic acid bacteria, according to Ashraf Hassan, associate professor of dairy science at South Dakota State University.

Related Articles


Low-fat products tend to have inferior texture and flavor because removing fat makes their structure rubbery, he explained. After examining bacteria from the dairy environment for more than 15 years, Hassan found a strain that mimics fat.

Some bacteria produce polysaccharides which can contain hundreds of sugar molecules, such as glucose, attached to one another. They bind significant amounts of water, according to Hassan.

The strain Hassan discovered produces polysaccharides with high water binding capacity that then improve the quality of low-fat dairy products. "They give the same mouth feel [as fat] by increasing the thickness and giving smoothness," he added.

Hassan first used the bacteria to make low-fat cheese, which the nationally recognized SDSU dairy products judging team could not discern from regular high-fat cheese. The bacteria's patent-pending application has been licensed to a multinational dairy ingredients company.

But that's only the beginning. The polysaccharide produced by this strain also improves the functionality of proteins recovered from the cheese by product, whey, Hassan explained. This protein-polysaccharide mixture can be dried and added to salad dressing, mayonnaise or even processed meats like sausage. Its gelling properties will help make products that "firm quickly and have a much stronger body," he said.

Not only does this add value to the whey, but the mixture reduces manufacturing costs, he said. When mixed with polysaccharide, less protein is needed to give the same effect.

Furthermore, the polysaccharide produced by this strain minimizes the negative impact of heat on milk protein during pasteurization, according to Hassan. Essentially, heat breaks down protein, a process called denaturation, but the bacteria encapsulate protein, thereby maintaining more of its nutritional value.

This unique polysaccharide will also address a long-standing problem in the dairy industry--the formation of biofilm on milk processing equipment, Hassan noted. Milk bacteria attach to contact surfaces and form colonies that can resist traditional cleaning methods. The bacteria Hassan identified interfere with the formation of these biofilms, possibly mitigating this industrywide problem.

Because plaque is a classic case of biofilm developing on a person's teeth, this discovery may also translate into better human hygiene, according to Hassan. Eating yogurt made with these bacteria may help reduce plaque and prevent tooth decay.

To explore this possibility, Hassan is collaborating with a researcher from University of Iowa's School of Dentistry to apply for funding from the National Institutes of Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by South Dakota State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

South Dakota State University. "Tastier low-fat products: Bacteria may improve low-fat products, help dairy producers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140527185316.htm>.
South Dakota State University. (2014, May 27). Tastier low-fat products: Bacteria may improve low-fat products, help dairy producers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140527185316.htm
South Dakota State University. "Tastier low-fat products: Bacteria may improve low-fat products, help dairy producers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140527185316.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Monarch Butterflies Descend Upon Mexican Forest During Annual Migration

Monarch Butterflies Descend Upon Mexican Forest During Annual Migration

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Dec. 19, 2014) Millions of monarch butterflies begin to descend onto Mexico as part of their annual migration south. Rough Cut (no reporter narration) Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) The new year is coming and nothing will energize you more for 2015 than protein-filled foods. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) gives his favorite high protein foods that will help you build muscle, lose fat and have endless energy. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Birds Might Be Better Meteorologists Than Us

Birds Might Be Better Meteorologists Than Us

Newsy (Dec. 19, 2014) A new study suggests a certain type of bird was able to sense a tornado outbreak that moved through the U.S. a day before it hit. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins