Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Gene variant associated with type 2 diabetes in Latino population

Date:
June 10, 2014
Source:
American Medical Association
Summary:
A genetic analysis of DNA samples of approximately 3,700 Mexican and U.S. Latino individuals identified a gene variant that was associated with a 5-fold increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, findings that may have implications for screening in this population, according to a study. The effect size of the variant is the largest observed to date for any diabetes variant with a frequency more than 1 in 1,000.

A genetic analysis of DNA samples of approximately 3,700 Mexican and U.S. Latino individuals identified a gene variant that was associated with a 5-fold increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, findings that may have implications for screening in this population, according to a study in the June 11 issue of JAMA, a diabetes theme issue.

The estimated prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Mexican adults was 14.4 percent in 2006, making it one of the leading causes of death in Mexico. Latino populations (defined as persons who trace their origin to Central and South America, and other Spanish cultures), have one of the highest prevalences of type 2 diabetes worldwide. Identifying genetic factors associated with type 2 diabetes in Latino populations could improve risk prediction and focus treatment choice based on knowledge of the underlying biology of the disease, according to background information in the study.

Karol Estrada, Ph.D., of the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, Mass., and colleagues with the SIGMA Type 2 Diabetes Consortium, performed whole-exome (part of the genome) sequencing (which captures both common and rare genetic variants in the protein-coding regions of genes) on DNA samples from 3,756 Mexican and U.S. Latino individuals (1,794 with type 2 diabetes and 1,962 without diabetes) recruited from 1993 to 2013. One variant was further tested for and association with type 2 diabetes in large multiethnic data sets of 14,276 participants.

The researchers found that a single rare variant (c.1522G>A [p.E508K]) of the HNF1A gene was associated with about a 5 times higher odds of type 2 diabetes, but it was not associated with an early-onset form of diabetes. This variant was observed in 0.36 percent of participants without type 2 diabetes and 2.1 percent of participants with it. In the multiethnic replication data sets, the p.E508K variant was seen only in Latino patients. Carriers and noncarriers of this mutation with type 2 diabetes had no significant differences in clinical characteristics, including age at onset.

The effect size of the variant is the largest observed to date for any diabetes variant with a frequency more than 1 in 1,000.

"Further research is warranted to evaluate the clinical relevance of these findings, including the benefits of selective population screening and the choice of genotype-guided therapeutic regimens," the authors conclude.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Medical Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Karol Estrada, Ingvild Aukrust, Lise Bjørkhaug, Noël P. Burtt, Josep M. Mercader, Humberto García-Ortiz, Alicia Huerta-Chagoya, Hortensia Moreno-Macías, Geoffrey Walford, Jason Flannick, Amy L. Williams, María J. Gómez-Vázquez, Juan C. Fernandez-Lopez, Angélica Martínez-Hernández, Federico Centeno-Cruz, Elvia Mendoza-Caamal, Cristina Revilla-Monsalve, Sergio Islas-Andrade, Emilio J. Córdova, Xavier Soberón, María E. González-Villalpando, E. Henderson, Lynne R. Wilkens, Loic Le Marchand, Olimpia Arellano-Campos, Maria L. Ordóñez-Sánchez, Maribel Rodríguez-Torres, Rosario Rodríguez-Guillén, Laura Riba, Laeya A. Najmi, Suzanne B.R. Jacobs, Timothy Fennell, Stacey Gabriel, Pierre Fontanillas, Craig L. Hanis, Donna M. Lehman, Christopher P. Jenkinson, Hanna E. Abboud, Graeme I. Bell, Maria L. Cortes, Michael Boehnke, Clicerio González-Villalpando, Lorena Orozco, Christopher A. Haiman, Teresa Tusié-Luna, Carlos A. Aguilar-Salinas, David Altshuler, Pål R. Njølstad, Jose C. Florez, Daniel G. MacArthur. Association of a Low-Frequency Variant inHNF1AWith Type 2 Diabetes in a Latino Population. JAMA, 2014; 311 (22): 2305 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.6511

Cite This Page:

American Medical Association. "Gene variant associated with type 2 diabetes in Latino population." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140610205103.htm>.
American Medical Association. (2014, June 10). Gene variant associated with type 2 diabetes in Latino population. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140610205103.htm
American Medical Association. "Gene variant associated with type 2 diabetes in Latino population." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140610205103.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

AP (July 31, 2014) — Sarasota County, Florida health officials have issued a warning against eating raw oysters and exposing open wounds to coastal and inland waters after a dangerous bacteria killed one person and made another sick. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) — Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Newsy (July 30, 2014) — The Peace Corps is one of several U.S.-based organizations to pull workers out of West Africa because of the Ebola outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Weather Kills 2K A Year, But Storms Aren't The Main Offender

Weather Kills 2K A Year, But Storms Aren't The Main Offender

Newsy (July 30, 2014) — Health officials say 2,000 deaths occur each year in the U.S. due to weather, but it's excessive heat and cold that claim the most lives. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:  

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile iPhone Android Web
    Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins