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Popular artificial sweetener and impact on therapeutic drugs studied

Date:
June 16, 2014
Source:
Taylor & Francis
Summary:
One of the active ingredients in a popular artificial sweetener could have the potential to limit the impact of therapeutic drugs, reduce the number and balance of beneficial bacteria in the gut and alter hormone secretion, according to an article. The article details an experiment involving a popular artificial sweetener, which comprises the high-potency sucralose (1.1%) and the fillers maltodextrin and glucose.

One of the active ingredients in a popular artificial sweetener could have the potential to limit the impact of therapeutic drugs, reduce the number and balance of beneficial bacteria in the gut and alter hormone secretion, according to an article published in Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A: Current Issues.

Authored by Susan Schiffman and her colleagues, the article details an experiment involving a popular artificial sweetener, which comprises the high-potency sucralose (1.1%) and the fillers maltodextrin and glucose.

The study involved an experiment using Sprague-Dawley rats that were administered the artificial sweetener over a 12-week period. Following a bacterial analysis of the rats' fecal samples and measurement of fecal pH, the article concluded that artificial sweetener resulted in various adverse effects in the rats, including:

  • Reduction in beneficial fecal microflora
  • Increased fecal pH
  • Enhanced expression levels of P-gp, CYP3A4,and CYP2D1, which are known to limit the bioavailability of orally administered drugs

"At concentrations typically used in foods and drinks, sucralose suppresses beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract with less effect on pathogenic bacteria," article co-author Susan Schiffman, Ph.D said. "Most consumers are unaware of these effects because no warning label appears on products containing sucralose." Schiffman also said went onto saythat the change in balance of gastrointestinal bacteria has been associated with weight gain and obesity. At elevated levels, sucralose also damages DNA. These biological effects occur at the levels of sucralose currently approved by regulatory agencies for use in the food supply.


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The above story is based on materials provided by Taylor & Francis. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Taylor & Francis. "Popular artificial sweetener and impact on therapeutic drugs studied." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140616130720.htm>.
Taylor & Francis. (2014, June 16). Popular artificial sweetener and impact on therapeutic drugs studied. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140616130720.htm
Taylor & Francis. "Popular artificial sweetener and impact on therapeutic drugs studied." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140616130720.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

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