Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Blood sugar improves with first gastrointestinal microbiome modulator, NM504

Date:
June 23, 2014
Source:
The Endocrine Society
Summary:
In adults with prediabetes, a new drug that alters microbial populations and their environment in the gastrointestinal tract improves glucose tolerance -- the body's response to consuming carbohydrates -- after four weeks of treatment and without a change in diet. The not-yet-named therapeutic, NM504, is the first in a new class of therapies known as GI microbiome modulators. The GI microbiome -- the mix of microbial and associated physical and chemical factors in the digestive system -- may play a critical part in regulating the body's metabolism, some researchers believe.

In adults with prediabetes, a new drug that alters microbial populations and their environment in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract improves glucose tolerance -- the body's response to consuming carbohydrates -- after four weeks of treatment and without a change in diet. These results, from a pilot study, will be presented Monday at the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society: ICE/ENDO 2014 in Chicago.

Related Articles


The not-yet-named therapeutic, NM504, is the first in a new class of therapies known as GI microbiome modulators. The GI microbiome -- the mix of microbial and associated physical and chemical factors in the digestive system -- may play a critical part in regulating the body's metabolism, some researchers believe. There is recent scientific evidence that microbial imbalance, or dysbiosis, in the gut contributes to the development of Type 2 diabetes.

"We believe that modern Western diets contribute to development of Type 2 diabetes, in part because they change the habitat of the microorganisms that reside in the gut. This shifts the microbial populations that live there in ways that affect metabolic health," said Mark Heiman, PhD, the study's principal investigator. Heiman is chief scientific officer for MicroBiome Therapeutics, the Colorado-based biotechnology company that is developing NM504 and sponsored the study.

NM504 is designed to shift the GI bacteria and other microorganisms -- called microbiota -- and their environment in specific ways to achieve improved health outcomes, according to Heiman. He said the drug contains concentrated bioactive food ingredients: inulin, a fiber; beta-glucan and polyphenolic antioxidant compounds.

Heiman and colleagues conducted a study in 28 adults with prediabetes, a frequent precursor to Type 2 diabetes. Fourteen subjects were randomly assigned to receive NM504 twice a day, and the other 14 were assigned to receive placebo, or "dummy" material. Neither the subjects nor the investigators were aware of the drug assignments. Before any treatment and again at four weeks of treatment, all subjects had an oral glucose challenge. In this test, they drank a concentrated glucose (sugary) drink and then had their blood sugar levels tested at various times and compared with pretest levels.

Blood sugar levels at 120 and 180 minutes after the glucose challenge were significantly lower in subjects who took NM504 than those who received the placebo, Heiman reported. Also during this test, NM504 increased insulin sensitivity, the body's ability to successfully clear glucose from the bloodstream.

Compared with placebo, NM504 treatment also decreased the desire to eat, which Heiman said Microbiome Therapeutics' researchers had hoped the therapeutic would do. He said the subjects tolerated NM504 well, with only a mild increase in flatulence, or gas.

"This work indicates a new therapeutic target -- the GI microbiome -- that has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of metabolic diseases such as Type 2 diabetes," Heiman commented.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Endocrine Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

The Endocrine Society. "Blood sugar improves with first gastrointestinal microbiome modulator, NM504." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140623120414.htm>.
The Endocrine Society. (2014, June 23). Blood sugar improves with first gastrointestinal microbiome modulator, NM504. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140623120414.htm
The Endocrine Society. "Blood sugar improves with first gastrointestinal microbiome modulator, NM504." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140623120414.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, December 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) Scientists in Amsterdam say couples transfer tens of millions of microbes when they kiss, encouraging healthy exposure to bacteria. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Brain-Dwelling Tapeworm Reveals Genetic Secrets

Brain-Dwelling Tapeworm Reveals Genetic Secrets

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) Cambridge scientists have unravelled the genetic code of a rare tapeworm that lived inside a patient's brain for at least four year. Researchers hope it will present new opportunities to diagnose and treat this invasive parasite. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Americans Drink More in the Winter

Americans Drink More in the Winter

Buzz60 (Dec. 22, 2014) The BACtrack breathalyzer app analyzed Americans' blood alcohol content and found out a whole lot of interesting things about their drinking habits. Mara Montalbano (@maramontalbano) has more. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A touch-free phone developed in Israel enables the mobility-impaired to operate smart phones with just a movement of the head. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins