Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New device could improve biomarker analyses

Date:
June 25, 2014
Source:
KTH The Royal Institute of Technology
Summary:
A new devise could offer a more reliable alternative for detecting biomarkers in patients facing such illnesses as cancer or malaria. Whether to extract circulating tumor cells from the blood of a cancer patient, or to measure the elasticity of red blood cells due to malaria infection, the physical attributes of cells are important biomarkers in medicine.

Visualization from a numerical simulation of a cell flowing past the obstacle through the microfluidic device.
Credit: Image courtesy of KTH The Royal Institute of Technology

A device proposed by researchers at Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology could offer a more reliable alternative for detecting biomarkers in patients facing such illnesses as cancer or malaria.

Whether to extract circulating tumor cells from the blood of a cancer patient, or to measure the elasticity of red blood cells due to malaria infection, the physical attributes of cells are important biomarkers in medicine.

Yet today, most cell sorting techniques rely on the difference between chemical properties of the cells.

The problem is chemical properties don't give pathologists the full picture. Two cells can have very similar chemical properties, but different physical properties. Size, shape and elasticity, or deformability, are important attributes that can be also enable cell sorting, given the right kind of device.

Luca Brandt, a professor of fluid mechanics at KTH, says his team used extensive computational simulations to propose a microfluidic device that would sort cells according to their elasticity.

Dhrubaditya Mitra, Assistant Professor in theoretical physics at NORDITA, Nordic Institute of Theoretical Physics at KTH and Stockholm University, offers an example of why elasticity matters. If you are infected with malaria, the physical nature of your red blood cells changes, he says.

"They become harder. And red blood cells also become harder as they get older too," Mitra says. "These harder red blood cells are filtered by the spleen which acts like a sieve. The softer red blood cells can squeeze through the gaps but the harder ones cannot."

Consisting of a duct embedded with a semi-cylindrical obstacle, and a diffuser, a microfluidic device works in a similar fashion. Several kinds of microfluidic devices have been fabricated to detect biophysical markers. But the big challenge has been in designing the geometries that allow for efficient cell sorting, Brandt says.

The design was proposed by the researchers at KTH Linne FLOW Centre and SeRC (Swedish e-Science Centre): Lailai Zhu, who implemented the numerical model, and Cecilia Rorai, who worked together under the guidance of Brandt and Mitra. Their work draws on numerical techniques and computational capabilities developed in the last decade to handle the complexity of microscale flows. The researchers recently published their paper in the Royal Society of Chemistry's journal, Soft Matter.

"A particular novelty of our work is that this design process has not been done in a laboratory but as a computer simulation," Brandt says, comparing their computer simulations to the early stages of aircraft or vehicle design. "We hope that our work will bring such a change to design of microfluidic devices, too."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by KTH The Royal Institute of Technology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Lailai Zhu, Cecilia Rorai, Dhrubaditya Mitra, Luca Brandt. A microfluidic device to sort capsules by deformability: A numerical study. Soft Matter, 2014; DOI: 10.1039/C4SM01097C

Cite This Page:

KTH The Royal Institute of Technology. "New device could improve biomarker analyses." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140625101556.htm>.
KTH The Royal Institute of Technology. (2014, June 25). New device could improve biomarker analyses. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140625101556.htm
KTH The Royal Institute of Technology. "New device could improve biomarker analyses." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140625101556.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

TheStreet (July 21, 2014) New research shows Gilead Science's drug Sovaldi helps in curing hepatitis C in those who suffer from HIV. In a medical study, the combination of Gilead's Hep C drug with anti-viral drug Ribavirin cured 76% of HIV-positive patients suffering from the most common hepatitis C strain. Hepatitis C and related complications have been a top cause of death in HIV-positive patients. Typical medication used to treat the disease, including interferon proteins, tended to react badly with HIV drugs. However, Sovaldi's %1,000-a-pill price tag could limit the number of patients able to access the treatment. TheStreet's Keris Lahiff reports from New York. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com
$23.6 Billion Awarded To Widow In Smoking Lawsuit

$23.6 Billion Awarded To Widow In Smoking Lawsuit

Newsy (July 20, 2014) Cynthia Robinson claims R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company hid the health and addiction risks of its products, leading to the death of her husband in 1996. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tooth Plaque Provides Insight Into Diets Of Ancient People

Tooth Plaque Provides Insight Into Diets Of Ancient People

Newsy (July 19, 2014) Research on plaque from ancient teeth shows that our prehistoric ancestor's had a detailed understanding of plants long before developing agriculture. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Contaminated Water Kills 3 Babies in South African Town

Contaminated Water Kills 3 Babies in South African Town

AFP (July 18, 2014) Contaminated water in South Africa's northwestern town of Bloemhof kills three babies and hospitalises over 500 people. The incident highlights growing fears over water safety in South Africa. Duration: 02:22 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins