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Variations in key gene predict cancer patients' risk for radiation-induced toxicity

Date:
July 8, 2014
Source:
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Summary:
Key genetic variants may affect how cancer patients respond to radiation treatments, according to a study. The current results are based on a genome-wide association study, a type of study in which researchers examine numerous genetic variants to see if any of them are associated with a certain type of complication, which could sometimes emerge years after treatment was completed.

Key genetic variants may affect how cancer patients respond to radiation treatments, according to a study published in Nature Genetics. The research team, which included researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, found that variations in the TANC1 gene are associated with a greater risk for radiation-driven side effects in prostate cancer patients, which include incontinence, impotence and diarrhea.

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The current results are based on a genome-wide association study, a type of study in which researchers examine numerous genetic variants to see if any of them are associated with a certain type of complication, which could sometimes emerge years after treatment was completed.

"Our findings, which were replicated in two additional patient groups, represent a significant step towards developing personalized treatment plans for prostate cancer patients," said Barry S. Rosenstein, PhD, Professor, Radiation Oncology, Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the lead Mount Sinai investigator on the study. "Within five years, through the use of a predictive genomic test that will be created using the data obtained in the recent study, it may be possible to optimize treatment for a large number of cancer patients."

For the study, Dr. Rosenstein and his team obtained blood samples from nearly 400 patients who were receiving radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer. The blood samples were screened for roughly one million genetic markers, and each patient was monitored for at least two years to track incidents of side effects from the radiation. Data analysis showed which genetic markers were consistently associated with the development of complications following radiotherapy.

"The next step is to validate the results, and see if the same markers predict similar outcomes in patients with other forms of cancer," said Dr. Rosenstein. Using the genomic test being developed, treatment plans can be adjusted to minimize adverse effects thereby allowing for an improved quality life for many cancer survivors.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Laura Fachal, Antonio Gómez-Caamaño, Gillian C Barnett, Paula Peleteiro, Ana M Carballo, Patricia Calvo-Crespo, Sarah L Kerns, Manuel Sánchez-García, Ramón Lobato-Busto, Leila Dorling, Rebecca M Elliott, David P Dearnaley, Matthew R Sydes, Emma Hall, Neil G Burnet, Ángel Carracedo, Barry S Rosenstein, Catharine M L West, Alison M Dunning, Ana Vega. A three-stage genome-wide association study identifies a susceptibility locus for late radiotherapy toxicity at 2q24.1. Nature Genetics, 2014; DOI: 10.1038/ng.3020

Cite This Page:

The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine. "Variations in key gene predict cancer patients' risk for radiation-induced toxicity." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 July 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140708121730.htm>.
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine. (2014, July 8). Variations in key gene predict cancer patients' risk for radiation-induced toxicity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140708121730.htm
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine. "Variations in key gene predict cancer patients' risk for radiation-induced toxicity." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140708121730.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

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