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Western Wall wearing away? Discovery of extreme erosion process could guide new preservation techniques

Date:
August 11, 2014
Source:
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Summary:
Researchers have investigated erosion in the different kinds of limestone in the Western Wall at the foot of Jerusalem's Temple Mount. Stones made up of large crystals were almost unchanged in 2000 years, while limestone with small crystals eroded much faster and in some places had receded by tens of centimeters, potentially weakening the wall's structure. The researchers describe an accelerated erosion process that  explains why some rocks are more weathered than others, and showed that chemo-mechanical erosion extends down to the tiny micron scale.

Part of the Western Wall showing highly eroded blocks alongside well preserved stones.
Credit: Dr. Simon Emmanuel, Hebrew University

Researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem investigated erosion in the different kinds of limestone in the Western Wall at the foot of Jerusalem's Temple Mount. Stones made up of large crystals were almost unchanged in 2000 years, while limestone with small crystals eroded much faster and in some places had receded by tens of centimeters, potentially weakening the wall's structure. The researchers describe an accelerated erosion process that explains why some rocks are more weathered than others, and showed that chemo-mechanical erosion extends down to the tiny micron scale. The findings could have important implications for regional and global carbonate weathering, and could help guide the development of effective preservation techniques that slow the rate of erosion in order to protect cultural heritage sites around the world.

Visitors to the Western Wall in Jerusalem can see that some of its stones are extremely eroded. This is good news for people placing prayer notes in the wall's cracks and crevices, but presents a problem for engineers concerned about the structure's stability.

The Western Wall is a remnant of the ancient wall that surrounded the courtyard of the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem. It is located in Jerusalem's Old City at the foot of the Temple Mount.

To calculate the erosion in the different kinds of limestone that make up the Western Wall, researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem used a laser scan to create an accurate three-dimensional computer model. The researchers are Dr. Simon Emmanuel, the Harry P. Kaufmann Senior Lecturer in Environmental Water Technology, and PhD student Mrs. Yael Levenson, at the Hebrew University's Institute of Earth Sciences.

As reported in an article accepted for publication in the journal Geology, they found that stones made up of relatively large crystals were resistant to wear, so that they were almost unchanged in the 2000 years since they were originally put in place. By contrast, limestone with very small crystals (about one thousandth of a millimeter in size) eroded far more quickly.

In some cases, extreme erosion rates in fine-grained micritic limestone blocks were up to 100 times faster than the average rates estimated for the coarse-grained limestone blocks. In some places these stones had receded by tens of centimeters, potentially weakening the overall structure.

To understand what causes the two types of rock to behave differently, the researchers collected samples from ancient quarries thought to have supplied the stones for the Second Temple. Using a powerful atomic force microscope, they were able to see how the rocks disintegrated when they came into contact with water. During the experiments on rocks made up of small crystals, tiny particles rapidly detached from the surface of the rock. These experiments simulated the way in which rain water interacts with limestone in nature.

Observed for the first time in Dr Emmanuel's lab, this process of accelerated erosion can explain why some rocks are more weathered than others. While mechanical weathering is thought to act on blocks and chips of rock at the visible outcrop scale, the researchers showed for the first time that chemo-mechanical erosion extends down to the tiny micron scale. The findings could have important implications for regional and global carbonate weathering.

According to Dr. Emmanuel, "Understanding such weathering processes could help guide the development of effective preservation techniques. For example, it may be possible to develop materials that slow the rate of erosion by binding the tiny crystals in the rock together. Advanced engineering techniques like this should assist efforts to protect not only the Western Wall, but other cultural heritage sites in Israel and around the world."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. S. Emmanuel, Y. Levenson. Limestone weathering rates accelerated by micron-scale grain detachment. Geology, 2014; DOI: 10.1130/G35815.1

Cite This Page:

Hebrew University of Jerusalem. "Western Wall wearing away? Discovery of extreme erosion process could guide new preservation techniques." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140811124628.htm>.
Hebrew University of Jerusalem. (2014, August 11). Western Wall wearing away? Discovery of extreme erosion process could guide new preservation techniques. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140811124628.htm
Hebrew University of Jerusalem. "Western Wall wearing away? Discovery of extreme erosion process could guide new preservation techniques." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140811124628.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

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