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Entrepreneurs design automated cutting equipment applicable to various industries

Date:
January 6, 2015
Source:
Investigación y Desarrollo
Summary:
The "OpeCNC" system, consists of software and hardware for machine control. It can be applied from ornamental ironwork, cutting spare parts, pipes to advertisements.
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The "OpeCNC" system, consists of software and hardware for machine control. It can be applied from ornamental ironwork, cutting spare parts, pipes to advertisements.
Credit: Image courtesy of Investigación y Desarrollo

The "OpeCNC" system, consists of software and hardware for machine control. It can be applied from ornamental ironwork, cutting spare parts, pipes to advertisements.

When the engineer Isaac Navarro Alcazar needed to make two meters high 3D dinosaur figures, you did not find the right tool to make the cuts, so he decided to make his own machine: an innovative, automated and efficient equipment capable of making plasma cuts through plating and metal foils such as carbon steel, stainless steel and aluminum, among others.

A graduate of the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN), with a Bachelor in Communications and Electronics specializing in control and automation, Navarro Alcazar and his brother designed a machine that can cut "any type pf figures, however complex."

The entrepreneurs called the project "OpeCnc," which is a set of software and hardware to control these machines and "CNC" because of the computerized numerical control.

"With this technology, if a circular plate cut is required it can be made from an AutoCAD drawing with the actual measurements, we generate the code, translate it to the computer and the machine does the cutting," explained the Mexican entrepreneur.

The machine measures 1.22 x 3.05 meters, has mounted a plasma torch and cuts plates up to an inch wide. It can be applied in conventional and artistic ironwork, for example, to design and cut a door or window, plus the system also serves on advertising by executing metal channel letters.

It is applicable in various areas, since the machine adapts to the customer's requirement. "To date we have sold about eight machines and 16 equipment for cutting with a wooden router."

Engineer Navarro Alcazar recalls that when he started making the equipment he found that all elements had to be imported. Now they manufacture screws, zippers, pulleys and whatever they need to construct the machinery.

The entrepreneur recognizes that this technology is a niche market, because currently plate cutting is mostly done manually exposing the operator to toxic gases, hence their innovative automated cutting machine is more efficient.

"Our team only requires air and electricity, it doesn't use gases; it can be positioned in the market, because besides plasma cutting technology it can be adapted to drills, milling machines, lathes and 3D printing equipment, so we developed software for specific needs."

The "OpenCNC" project is in the incubator at IPN, according to the engineer Navarro Alcázar, when they have enough investment they will formalize the company and get a proper space to make the machines and the manufacturing process.

"We want to bring this team to the Mexican industry, because we have been recommended by word of mouth. On the other hand, people think that the machine is expensive and it is not; we manufacture the components to reduce cost and make it affordable for stakeholders."


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Investigación y Desarrollo. "Entrepreneurs design automated cutting equipment applicable to various industries." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 January 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150106081510.htm>.
Investigación y Desarrollo. (2015, January 6). Entrepreneurs design automated cutting equipment applicable to various industries. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150106081510.htm
Investigación y Desarrollo. "Entrepreneurs design automated cutting equipment applicable to various industries." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150106081510.htm (accessed May 23, 2017).

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